Flint, MI- The state is ready to finalize a settlement over the lead contaminated water in the city. The original  lawsuit was filed last year by a coalition of religious, environmental, and civil rights activists. The coalition alleged Flint water was not safe to drink because state and city officials were violating the Safe Drinking Water Act.
U.S. District Judge David Lawson will review the settlement during a hearing on Tuesday. Under terms of the deal, the state will spend $87 million to help ensure safe drinking water in Flint by replacing  lead and galvanized steel service lines at homes served by the Flint’s municipal water system. Also, the state will continue operating at least nine water distribution centers Monday through Saturday, also providing free filters, cartridges, bottled water and water-testing kits.

The centers can be closed after May 1 if 20 people or fewer pick up supplies at a particular location.
The city, meanwhile, will identify what type of service lines are in place at at least 18,000 homes and replace any lead or galvanized steel with copper service lines.
The proposed settlement comes 14 months after the coalition sued several parties, including state Treasurer Nick Khouri, the five-member Flint Receivership Transition Advisory Board, Flint City Administrator Natasha Henderson and the city of Flint.

The government parties also agreed to monitor lead levels in Flint’s tap water for consecutive six-month periods. The settlement is retroactive to Jan. 1.

Advertisements