Category: #BlackSignal

Black Students Harassed By #GoodCops Because They Wore Black And The White Teachers Didn’t Like It

Black clothing prompted an increased police presence at Collierville High School Wednesday.

Instead of dressing up in patriotic clothing for the schools “America Day,” students wore black to make a statement.

A spokesperson with the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office told FOX13 extra deputies were on campus as a precaution because there were rumors of an after school fight. Collierville Police were also on campus, but the Collierville High School did not call any police.

Students who wore the black clothes say the rumors were unfounded, and that the decision to dress in black was just a statement.

“We all wore black because black lives matter,” said Artavious Morris.

It was a quiet statement that provoked a loud response.

When students, like Artavious, Brennan, Sami, and Jordan got out of school, they were surprised by the amount of police outside.

“After school they thought we were going to have a riot with the other students. And they had extra police officers, security guards and everything after school. We couldn’t even take a picture up the street, they followed us…everywhere, legit everywhere,” said Morris.

“It wasn’t even called for because we mess with the white people,” said Sami Thames.

The students Caucasian classmates had mixed reactions.

“I know some white kids that said we support y’all, I thank y’all for wearing black,” said Thames.

Others were not supportive at all.

“We said we were going to be the bigger person about it,” said Thames. “Some dude [on Twitter] said, tell the police to shoot us. And some dude put the Confederate flag up. It doesn’t bother us at all, we just live on.”

Group planned to protest National Anthem at Collierville High School football game

A group people planned to take a stand by taking a seat at Collierville High School.

FOX13 learned a group planned to protest the National Anthem during the Collierville High School football game Friday night. reverse-racism-1

However, it appears that group did not follow through with the plan. FOX13 went to the game and did not observe anyone protesting the anthem.

It was planned as a Black Lives Matter peaceful protest, but would not officially be associated with the Black Lives Matter movement.

The group planned to wear all black and sit, “In solidarity with black athletes across the country.”

This comes as some professional athletes have chosen to protest the anthem.

A group of Collierville High School students wore all black during “America Day,” a homecoming event this week where students were encouraged to wear patriotic gear.

Extra deputies from the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office were brought in to ensure school dismissal was peaceful that day.

>>Collierville schools releases statement after some students wear all black for “America Day”

FOX13 learned a group of students at Houston High School also wore all black to school in protest this week.

 

 

2 Little Girls Shot And One Dead By White Man In Texas.

“We’re going to work this until this is resolved,” Wichita Falls Police Chief Manuel Borrego said late Friday afternoon after two girls were shot in a normally quiet residential neighborhood in southwest Wichita Falls.

“We’ll be working some long hours on this,” the chief said.

The shooting happened about 3:30 p.m. in the alley behind the 5100 block of Kingston Drive.

The names of the girls were not immediately released by police. Although word quickly spread in the neighborhood and on social media that one of the girls had died at the scene, police did not immediately confirm that.

Borrego confirmed they were young girls and witness reports said they appeared to be of junior high school age.

“It’s very tragic and heartbreaking that this involved two young people,” Borrego said.

Wichita Falls Independent School District Superintendent Michael Kuhrt later confirmed the two girls shot were students at McNiel Middle School. Kuhrt said one of the victims died, while the other is in guarded condition.

“Please know that the district is coordinating efforts to provide grief counselors for students,” Kuhrt said in his statement. “As soon as we have more information about those resources, we will pass that along to you.

“As a district, we are saddened by this senseless act of violence and our thoughts and prayers are with all of those involved.”

WFISD posted Kuhrt’s statement on their website.

The suspect was described as a white male, possibly between the ages of 16 and 18 with shaggy brown hair, possibly driving a black pickup. Witness reports indicated he was armed with a rifle.

About 5 p.m. shots rang out again in the area, apparently coming from nearby Tower Drive.

Police rushed from the shooting scene to where the shots were reported, and two people were detained after searching a residence in the 5100 block of Tower. It was not immediately clear whether either of those individuals was suspected in the shooting of the girls.

Department of Public Safety Troopers, as well as officials from the Wichita County District Attorney’s Office and Texas Game Wardens joined WFPD in the vicinity of Tower and Trinidad. Officials said no one appeared to be injured in that incident.

Wichita Falls Police asked that anyone who might have surveillance video related to the incident to please contact the police department. Those people can remain anonymous.

A Wichita Falls ISD spokesperson said security was tightened for the Rider-Lubbock Coronado football game, played in nearby Memorial Stadium Friday night.

An anonymous donor came forward and matched Crime Stoppers initial reward of $2,500 for information leading to the arrest of the shooting suspect, jumping the total to $5,000. Crime Stoppers can be reached at 1-800-322-9888, or 322-9888 locally.

This story will be updated as we get more information.

A White Teacher Was Determined To Make A Little Black Girl Cry.

Two Upstate parents are looking for answers after they said a teacher threw away their first-grader’s shoes at Bryson Elementary in Simpsonville last week.

Six-year-old Taraji Edward’s mother said she knew there was a problem when she was getting her daughter ready for school the next day.

“She began to cry, ‘no mommy I don’t want to wear those sandals’,” Chartrese Edwards.shoes-pic-for-eryn

Edwards said she asked her daughter why, and that’s when her daughter told her the teacher had thrown them away the day before.

“I was messing with my shoes, and the teacher told me eight times or seven, and I never listened,” Taraji said.

She said the strap was bothering her in math class last week. Even at six-years-old, Taraji  admits her part but said the issue is what happened after.

Taraji said the teacher made her walk around barefoot for a while before she was told she could go get her shoes from the trash and put them back on her feet.

“I feel like it was malicious behavior,” Edwards said. “I’m angry about it because you could have used a better method.”

Taraji said she felt singled out. “I feel embarrassed, and I did not like how she treated me…That’s not a way I can make friends,” she said.

Edwards said she did speak with the principal and teacher at the school.

“She easily confessed,” Edwards said. ‘Yes I did.’ I told her to leave the shoes alone, and she did not listen to me.’”

Greenville County Schools District released the statement below regarding the incident:

“Greenville County Schools is taking this family’s concerns very seriously. The district does not tolerate embarrassment or humiliation as a form of punishment. This matter is being thoroughly investigated by Bryson Elementary and by district administrators.  The investigation is not yet complete. As this is a personnel matter, Greenville County Schools cannot release the teacher’s name or the disciplinary action taken, if the investigation determines that discipline is warranted.”

The parents have had meetings with the district and reached out to the school board. They said they want to see action taken against the teacher but don’t know if they’ll send their daughter back to the school.

“I haven’t made a decision for what we’re going to do further because I need to gain some trust,” Edwards said.

However, she’s not the only one with trust issues.

“I do not want to get treated like that,” Taraji said. “I’m only six.”

The mother said the school district approved a home bound teacher for her daughter on Tuesday afternoon.

The family has set up a GoFundMe page to raise money to send their daughter to a private school.

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They’re Mad Because Gabby Is Better Than Abby.

Supremacists and buck dancers are ruining U.S. gymnast Gabby Douglas’s Olympic adventure by attacking her appearance, accusing her of being unpatriotic, and by mocking her with a mean-spirited nickname, “Crabby Gabby”, on social media, her mother told Reuters.

The 20-year-old athlete has been attacked for a perceived lack of patriotism for not placing her hand over her heart as the U.S. anthem was played during a medal ceremony and for not joining a standing ovation for two team mates.

Her mother, Natalie Hawkins, says Douglas is heart-broken.

“She’s had to deal with people criticizing her hair, or people accusing her of bleaching her skin. They said she had breast enhancements, they said she wasn’t smiling enough, she’s unpatriotic. Then it went to not supporting your team mates. Now you’re “Crabby Gabby”,” Hawkins said in an interview.

“You name it and she got trampled. What did she ever do to anyone?”

For the second Games running, Douglas has found herself caught in a firestorm despite yet another gold winning performance in Rio.

In 2012 Twitter went into overdrive after Douglas became the first African-American gymnast to win the Olympic all-around title. But rather than lauding her excellence, critics rounded on her for the state of her hair during the final.

Four years on and Douglas has another Olympic gold, from the women’s team competition, but the sheen from that victory has also been tarnished after TV cameras showed her standing to attention during the national anthem.

“I don’t think respecting your country or your flag boils down to whether you put your hand over your heart or not,” Hawkins said.

“It’s in your actions towards your country, how well are you abiding by its laws, how well are you helping your fellow citizens?

“We grew up in the military community. My mum spent almost 30 years in the military, my dad’s a two-time Vietnam vet. Because of that it was so insulting that they would accuse my daughter of being unpatriotic when we are so tied to the military family.

“When the Star Spangled Banner is played, most military members either salute or stand to attention.”

But Tuesday’s furor over what the correct protocol is when the American flag is raised was neither the beginning nor the end of Douglas’ problems.

She was also criticized for not giving team mates Simone Biles and Aly Raisman a standing ovation when they claimed gold and silver in Thursday’s all around final.

With accusations that Douglas was angry and jealous at being denied a place in the final, since rules state only the top two performers from each country can progress to the final, #CrabbyGabby started trending on social media.

“We’ve been brought to many tears because I don’t know what she’s done to warrant such an attack. To me it looks like she is being bullied,” said Hawkins.

All this unwanted attention on her daughter has been painful for Hawkins to watch. Despite being in Rio to cheer on Douglas, she is unable to give her a comforting hug because of team rules limiting contact to phone calls and texts until they are done competing.

“What I saw in the stands was someone who was hurting and she was also angry,” added Hawkins.

“What was going through her head was ‘I’m being attacked for everything I do so I might as well not do anything. Because no matter what I do, I am being attacked’.”

Did Hawkins think Douglas was targeted because of her race?

“Many people are telling me that all the time. And that’s from white people and black people. I don’t want to believe (it’s a race attack) as I want to have more faith,” she said.

“But when I go on Twitter, I can’t help but see that all the blacks are saying: ‘was it just the white people that are saying this against us?’

“Maybe people are very frustrated. Our country has a lot of unrest and turmoil recently and people are frustrated and maybe they just want to vent and they just see someone innocent … and bully them.”

For now though, Hawkins says she has advised her daughter to stay offline and instead focus on competing in Sunday’s asymmetric bars final.

“They keep attacking her about not smiling but they don’t know what she is dealing with. If they did, this would not be a conversation. They would (understand). But this is not the time or place to tell that story,” said Hawkins, who raised four children as a single mother.

“I want … people to show me if they have ever seen Gabrielle being disrespectful … or say something inappropriate. There is nothing because for her being a role model is such a supreme honor.

“Gabrielle’s had her heart broken, but she’s determined she will go out (on Sunday) and she knows she still has a job to do for Team USA. It’s a huge honor for me to be her mother as she’s the bravest person I know.”

Former Black Panther Runs An Urban Farm to Give Ex-Prisoners a Fresh Start

As a former chairwoman of the Black Panther Party, Elaine Brown is no stranger to radical ideas. The 72-year-old has been an advocate on behalf of prisoners for many years. And now she’s determined to transform a vacant lot in West Oakland, California into a thriving urban farm business that employs former offenders.

Brown was chairwoman for the Black Panthers from 1974 to 1977, and after more than a 30-years away from the city, moved back to Oakland in 2010.

She first announced her project in October of 2014. The first step of her plan was to establish West Oakland Farms, a for-profit farm whose 40 raised beds are already overflowing with tomatoes, peppers, kale, squash, corn, and other produce.

Her plans for the future, include a juice bar, fitness center, grocery store, and tech design space, along with affordable housing on the city-owned property under the umbrella of the nonprofit organization she founded last year, Oakland & the World Enterprises.

“I’m not in the farm business,” she told Civil Eats recently. “I’m in the business of creating opportunities for Black men and women who are poor and lack the education, skills, and resources to return to a community that is rapidly gentrifying without economic avenues for them in mind.”

A good way to describe it, would be part prisoner re-entry program, part small business startup incubator, and part community hub. West Oakland Farms, functions as a post-prison support program, by giving individuals the chance to find employment. Each worker actually owns a piece of the garden. It’s an opportunity many ex-cons couldn’t have imagined coming out of prison. The farm, currently employs 10 former inmates on a part-time, rotating basis and pays them $20 an hour. It has also landed its first culinary client contract: Picán Restaurant, an upscale Southern-influenced restaurant in the city’s lively Uptown district, and one of the few Black-owned restaurants in the area.

“This is not a panacea, it’s a model,” she says. “People come out of the joint with nothing to do and $200 in their pocket. Once that money runs out … they’ll do anything to survive, including hitting somebody in the head for $20.” We have to create positive opportunities for these people to return to the community.”