Category: Happy Or Whatever

CEO Uses Trump Tax Cut to Combat Climate Change

CEO Rose Marcario has announced her company will donating $10 million dollars to combat climate change.

In letter posted to LinkedIn, Patagonia’s CEO announced her company is donating o non-profit groups who work on issues related to climate change and the environment. The money will be coming from the tax break Patagonia received under Trump’s tax reform bill. Under the new policy, Patagonia will be paying $10 million dollars less in taxes.

“Based on last year’s irresponsible tax cut, Patagonia will owe less in taxes this year—$10 million less, in fact,” CEO Rose Marcario writes. “Instead of putting the money back into our business, we’re responding by putting $10 million back into the planet. Our home planet needs it more than we do.”

Marcario referred to the government’s own newly released report on climate change,

“Our home planet is facing its greatest crisis because of human-caused climate disruption. All the extra heat we’ve trapped in the earth’s atmosphere is not only melting the poles and raising sea levels, it’s intensifying drought and accelerating the extinction of species. The most recent Climate Assessment report puts it in stark terms: the U.S. economy could lose hundreds of billions of dollars, and the climate crisis is already affecting all of us. Mega-fires. Toxic algae blooms. Deadly heat waves and deadly hurricanes. Far too many have suffered the consequences of global warming in recent months, and the political response has so far been woefully inadequate—and the denial is just evil.”

“Taxes protect the most vulnerable in our society, our public lands and other life-giving resources,” she added.  “In spite of this, the Trump administration initiated a corporate tax cut, threatening these services at the expense of our planet.”

Patagonia isn’t new to environmental causes. Their “1% for the Planet” program donates profits to environmental projects around the world.

A note on their company site claims Patagonia has donated more than $89 million to such causes since the program first launched.

And CEO Marcario was singled out by the White House, Barack Obama’s White House that is, back in 2015 for her efforts to protect the environment.

In response to the Republicans approach to climate change, Bloomberg notes that Patagonia is getting increasingly political.

In 2017 Patagonia sued the Trump administration for getting rid of protections on roughly 2 million acres of land in Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. “It was the biggest elimination of public lands in a pen stroke,” Marcario says. “We’ve been protecting wilderness for decades and our customers respect nature, so if the current administration wants to sell off our cultural heritage to the highest bidder, then we’re going to do everything we can to fight it.” This year the brand also launched Patagonia Action Works, a platform customers can use to find and support environmental nonprofits based on issue and location.

In 2018, Patagonia formally endorsed two Democratic Candidates for the U.S. Senate during the 2018 midterm elections. Both candidates won. And seeing as money and politics are the two measurements of power most at the forefront of Trump’s thinking, Patagonia’s latest message is something he and his allies should take note of.

Denver City Council Approves Plan for Safe Injection Sites

DENVER, CO — A plan to allow safe injection sites to help drug users in Denver is one step closer to becoming reality after it passed its first reading at Monday night’s city council meeting.

Safe injection sites allow for users of heroin and other drugs to go to a facility where they can get high without fear of arrest.

The plan passed with only one city council member, Kevin Flynn, voting against it on Monday. A second reading and final vote is scheduled for next Monday.

Supporters argue it reduces overdoses and deaths while opponents worry that it may enable drug users.

The plan is to establish it as a two year pilot program that would come with a lot of restrictions. The sites would have to be at least 1,000 feet from schools and day care centers.

Although the sites would offer free needles and medical care, users would provide their own drugs.

If approved by city council next week, the program would still have to be approved by state lawmakers next year.

FedEx Driver Won’t Face Charges For Fatally Punching Man Who Called Him Racial Slurs

Timothy Warren, a FedEx driver in Oregon will not face charges in connection with the September death of a Portland man he fatally punched, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office announced Monday.

There’s no indication Timothy Warren intended to kill Joseph Magnuson when Warren’s punch connected above Magnuson’s left eye on Sept. 26, Senior Deputy District Attorney Adam Gibbs wrote in a memo declining to prosecute Warren. A county medical examiner later determined Magnuson was in “extremely poor health” beforehand and that his fall to the ground aggravated pre-existing medical conditions and led to his death.

Gibbs also noted in the memo that Warren “was in his right” to challenge Joseph Magnuson.

Witnesses said Magnuson called Warren the n-word and “other aggressive and abusive phrases,” The Oregonian reported. Witnesses said Magnuson started the altercation by yelling at Warren “very aggressively” to slow down, the paper reported. When Warren tried to speak with Magnuson after stopping the vehicle, Magnuson called him racial slurs and threw a drink at the FedEx employee.Witnesses said Magnuson also hurled a bag of food at Warren before he threw a punch that missed.

Warren then hit Magnuson above his left eye, knocking him to the ground unconscious, the report said. Magnuson died a few days later.

“Oregon law contains no ‘duty to retreat’ and Mr. Warren was within his right to exit his vehicle and verbally challenge the manner in which Mr. Magnuson was addressing him,” the memo said. “Mr. Magnuson was the initial verbal aggressor; Mr. Warren responded in kind. Mr. Magnuson then escalated and became the initial physical aggressor; Mr. Warren again responded in kind.”

While Magnuson might still be alive if Warren had not stopped, Gibbs noted that “the decision by Mr. Warren, who is black, to not let the racist vitriol to which he was being subjected go unanswered is not of legal significance,” according to the paper.

Warren waited at the scene and cooperated with police, the paper reported.

New books for young readers encourage socialist values

“Good children’s fiction cultivates empathy, imagination, social conscience, and historical awareness. Some of the best children’s novels written during the early twentieth century also raise class consciousness—Natalie Savage Carson’s The Family Under the Bridge, for example; socialist E. Nesbit’s Railway Children, Eleanor Estes’s The Hundred Dresses, and the original Mary Poppins books, which are wonderfully critical of capitalism and give magical superpowers to a nanny and her working-class friends.

While the politics of these older books hold up well, it’s hard to miss how very white the characters are. Fortunately, a new wave of multicultural, politically attuned children’s fiction is now hitting the shelves. Thanks in part to a movement called “We Need Diverse Books,” many new novels for middle graders and young adults include more people of color, gay and lesbian characters, ethnic and religious minorities, and the differently abled.”

 

Full Article Linked Here. 

Lorri Nandrea

Parents #WalkAway From Conservative Son And Support His Democratic Rival

A Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Wisconsin on Monday called his parents’ decision to support his Democratic opponent “an intentional personal blow” and a “true representation” of political intolerance. Wisconsin GOP Senate candidate Kevin Nicholson slammed his own parents for making the “maximum contribution” to his Democratic opponent in a fiery editorial published by Fox News

The hopeful who is currently embroiled in an intense primary battle for the GOP nomination accused his parents of turning “their back on me, my wife” and their grandchildren following a report from CNN earlier this year that highlighted his parents’ donations to the incumbent Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.)

The column comes after a new attack ad from a group supporting his Republican opponent questioned whether Nicholson, a former Democrat, could be trusted. The ad used footage of Nicholson speaking in support of abortion rights at the 2000 Democratic National Convention. Nicholson’s primary challenger, Republican state Sen. Leah Vukmir, argues she’s the only true conservative in the race. The primary is a month away on Aug. 14.

He pointed to his parents’ donation as a “representation of the intolerance” in the Democratic Party.

“Adding to this, they decided to make the maximum contribution to my Democrat opponent in my campaign for U.S. Senate in Wisconsin, an intentional personal blow that made headlines across the country,” Nicholson said. “It was deliberate – and it is a true representation of the intolerance of a political philosophy that stands on the false platform of tolerance.”

Each of his parents reportedly gave $2,700 to the Wisconsin Democrat’s campaign in December, the largest amount they can give during the Democratic primary. Nicholson’s brother, Scott Nicholson, also gave the maximum amount allowed, $2,700, to Baldwin last year.

Accused child molester falls to his death trying to avoid parents and police 

A man accused of groping a boy during his sixth birthday party tried to escape a Queens apartment by going out the window — but instead plunged four stories to his death.
Edgar Collaguazo, 44, fell from his fourth story apartment about 1:05 a.m. On Thursday after furious parents called police and locked him in a bedroom of the Jackson Heights residence, sources said.

Collaguazo invited at least three kids — including the birthday boy, his 5-year-old female cousin and another boy — into his room to watch a movie. 

Eventually the 5 year old emerged and was acting oddly. When parents went to investigate they found  Collaguazo holding the boy on his lap, with his hand down the boy’s pants, touching his genitals.

Chaos soon broke out in the apartment as some of the parents present started attacking Collaguazo.

“I told them, ‘Stop beating him, already! I have called the police,’” the victim’s mother recalled.

The relatives then decided to lock Collaguazo in his bedroom while waiting for the police to arrive. When they opened the door shortly afterward, Collaguazo was gone. Only when they looked out the window did they realize that Collaguazo had fallen to his death, the boy’s mother said.

The 5-year-old cousin later told detectives that she rushed out of the room because Collaguazo had kissed her and warned her to keep quiet about it, the boy’s mother said.

“Bomb” in German back yard turns out to be garden produce 

BERLIN (AP) — A worried resident in Germany alerted police to what he thought was a World War II bomb in his garden. Officers rushed over — and found a particularly large zucchini.
Police were summoned to the scene in Bretten, near the southwestern city of Karlsruhe, on Thursday morning by an 81-year-old man.

They said in a statement Friday that officers determined “the object, which really did look very like a bomb” was actually a 40-centimeter (nearly 16-inch) zucchini.

The offending vegetable, which was very dark in color, weighed about five kilograms (11 pounds). Police believe someone threw it over a hedge into the garden.

Unexploded wartime bombs are unearthed frequently during construction work in Germany, often forcing authorities to evacuate tens of thousands of residents while they are defused.

2 NFL players buy Xbox for child wearing Kaepernick jersey 

Saundra Watts was killing time while her dog was groomed at Petco, when her 10-year-old grandson, Jaden, came running up to her.
“He’s jumping up and down, saying, ‘Nana! Nana! Nana! These two guys want to buy me an Xbox. You’ve got to come right now,’ ” Watts recalled in a phone interview.

“She did not believe me,” said Jaden, who had wandered into a GameStop next door. “She thought it was some person who was joking with me or something.”

When they entered GameStop, Jaden introduced Saundra to the two men in shorts and T-shirts who had made the generous offer: Washington Redskins running backs Keith Marshall and Rob Kelley.

“Is it okay if we buy your son an Xbox?” Marshall asked Saundra. “I was like, ‘Really?’ Now mind you, I didn’t know they were Redskins, and neither did Jaden.”

Jaden said Marshall and Kelley had complimented him on his Colin Kaepernick 49ers jersey when he walked into the video game store to inquire about the price of the Xbox One. Kelley said Marshall overheard Jaden mention something about saving up to buy the video game console and Marshall asked his teammate if he was interested in pitching in to buy it for him.

“I was cool with it,” Kelley said. “I wish someone would’ve done something like that for me when I was growing up. His family is probably able to do whatever they want, but everybody is not able to have the stuff that we have the luxury of having. … To make an impact on somebody, I have no problem with it.”

Saundra said she was shocked when Marshall told her he and Kelley played for the Redskins. While Kelley took a phone call, she and Jaden chatted with Marshall, who is on injured reserve for the second consecutive season after tearing his patella tendon during training camp, about his rehab and growing up in North Carolina. Jaden told Marshall he was a Cowboys fan, just like his dad, and a 49ers fan because of Kaepernick, who was released in March and remains out of a job.

“I liked how he wasn’t afraid to show what he thought,” Jaden, who is African American, said in a phone interview Thursday of Kaepernick’s decision to kneel during the national anthem to protest racism and police brutality last season. “He risked getting fired, which was a big thing. I wouldn’t even do that, but he did, and I really like him for standing out. I don’t know if people agree with it, but he just doesn’t care what people say and that’s inspired me and probably inspired other people.”

Before everyone parted ways, they took a photo, exchanged hugs and even phone numbers. Saundra told Marshall and Kelley, who also bought Jaden a copy of “NBA 2K18,” to stay humble and true to themselves. Marshall told Jaden to do the same, even when it came to his Cowboys fandom.

“I will never forget that,” Jaden said.
Joey Snapp, a Winchester man who witnessed Marshall and Kelley’s random act of kindness, posted about it on Facebook. Snapp tweeted his appreciation at Marshall and Kelley, neither of whom mentioned their generous act on social media.
“The family wanted a picture that they could have, so they took one, but we didn’t post anything,” said Kelley, who was at GameStop in search of “Midnight Club II,” which was released in 2003. “Stuff like that is done from the heart. That was something that we just did and it ain’t gotta be broadcasted. … Doing that, it felt so good just knowing that I didn’t have no ties to that kid, I didn’t have to do that. It felt good.”

NFL player Deshaun Watson gives his first paycheck to the women who work in the team cafeteria

HOUSTON, TX — Texans rookie quarterback Deshaun Watson’s personal motto is “If you can, you must”.

This week he showed himself to be a man of his word, when donated his first NFL game paycheck to three women who work in the NRG Stadium cafeteria and cook for the players. The three women were also especially affected by the flooding from Hurricane Harvey.

“For what you all do for us every day and never complain, I really appreciate you all, so I wanted to give my first game check to y’all to help y’all out in some type of way,” Watson told the woman in a video shared by the Texans. “Here you guys go.”

Watson, who has a base salary of $465,000, donated a check for $27,353.

He walked into the cafeteria with envelopes wrapped in ribbon and said, “Hopefully, that’s good and that can get you back on your feet. And anything else y’all need, I’m always here to help.”

Watson has been on the receiving end of a similar kindness in the past, as he and his family were once recipients of a house built by Habitat for Humanity.

 

Black confederate flag supporter dies in car crash 

The Mississippi Highway Patrol on Monday was investigating a car wreck outside Jacksonville that killed an outspoken advocate of the Confederate flag.
Anthony Hervey, 49, author of “Why I Wave the Confederate Flag, Written by a Black Man,” died Sunday, the state police said, after the Ford Explorer carrying him and Arlene Barnum, 60, of Stuart, Okla., went off the road and flipped over while returning from a pro-Confederate flag event in Birmingham, Alabama 

Hervey, who was from Mississippi drew attention over the years for his efforts to preserve the Confederate flag and was often seen wearing a Confederate uniform and waving a Confederate battle flag on the Oxford Square.

Barnum said the accident occurred on a state highway near Oxford after Mr. Hervey swerved to avoid another vehicle that had pulled alongside them. The other car, she said, first pulled up on the driver’s side. Mr. Hervey yelled something to the passengers in the other car, she said and then “sped up to get away.”

The car then drove around to the passenger side of the Ford Explorer, Mrs. Barnum said, and the S.U.V. veered into a ditch on the opposite side of the road. When Mr. Hervey steered the Explorer back up on the road, the S.U.V. began spinning and rolled over multiple times before landing on the highway’s right side.

“It rolled over hard,” she said. “With each roll, it felt like ‘I’m not dead yet. Which one of these rolls is going to kill me?’ ”

She said she tried to talk to Mr. Hervey after the vehicle came to a rest, while both were still strapped in their seatbelts. He never responded. After being transported to Baptist Memorial Hospital in Oxford, she learned Mr. Hervey had died. Mrs. Barnum suffered cuts and a fractured left foot.

Master Sgt. Ray Hall of the Highway Patrol in New Albany said that the accident was being investigated and that no other information would be available until reconstruction specialists had a chance to review the evidence. Rocky Kennedy, the coroner of Lafayette County, home of Oxford, deferred further comment until after the Highway Patrol investigation was completed.

The Saturday rally in Birmingham was in opposition to removing the Confederate memorial in the city’s Linn Park. The Birmingham Park and Recreation Board recently voted to remove the memorial, and a rally organizer, Charles Andrew Bodenheimer of Tallassee, Ala., said several members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans took part.

Both Mr. Hervey and Mrs. Barnum had relatives who were Confederate soldiers. Mrs. Barnum said that she became involved in efforts to preserve the Confederate flag because a Louisiana ancestor fought for the Confederacy. “I don’t like it when black people attack me on this,” she said. “I think it’s an attack on my Southern heritage.”