Category: Post Racial\

Diamond Reynolds wins lawsuit, #GoodCop Accuses her of being a drug user

Diamond Reynolds, who watched in horror when her boyfriend Philando Castile was fatally shot in front of her by a police officer in 2016, received an $800,000 settlement this week from two Minnesota cities for the trauma she endured, both for witnessing the shooting and for being wrongly arrested afterward.

On Tuesday night, the St. Anthony City Council voted to pay Reynolds $675,000 for her emotional distress and wrongful arrest. The League of Minnesota Cities and the city of Roseville pitched in $125,000.

However, noteveryone is happy with the settlement. Elysian city councilman Tom McBroom predicted would be spent within six months on crack cocaine. When challenged on why he’d think a woman with no crack-related criminal history would squander her boyfriend’s blood money that way, McBroom answered, “History.”

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In addition to being an elected official in the tiny southwestern Minnesota town of about 600, McBroom is also a sergeant of the Rice County Sheriff’s Office. That had Twitter users who stumbled upon his racist invective worried about his ability to objectively enforce the law.

Rice County Chief Deputy Jesse Thomas said Wednesday that he will be reviewing the incident.

City Pages reached out to McBroom on Facebook, asking him to address the tweets.

McBroom responded, “Who said I was Law Enforcement or council member. I’m a general contractor. Wrong person. Sorry.”

Nevertheless, several photos in McBroom’s Facebook profile showed him wearing the Rice County Sheriff’s Office uniform, and another is identical to his official portrait on the Elysian City Council website. City Pages asked Chief Deputy Thomas to verify the Facebook profile.

Later, McBroom called and admitted to denying his identity, “Just to screw with you. Because I can.”

He claimed people misunderstood his comment about “history,” explaining he was referring to the universal temptation of spending, rather than saving, large instant payouts. He lamented the lack of money management in cases of police settlements.

“I’ve seen them come to court. They’ve lost their children, but they come to court dressed to the nines with Michael Kors purses. To be frank with you, they don’t have a pot to piss in,” McBroom said. “I see it time and time again and I just shake my head and say why wasn’t there anyone to help that person?”

Asked then why he invoked crack cocaine specifically, McBroom rejected the notion that his comment had anything to do with race. Instead, he thought it was a common purchase for anyone in the cities.

“I have friends of mine in the Minneapolis Police Department. And you know, that’s an epidemic up there, crack cocaine and opioids.”

Later in the interview, he inexplicably attempted to deny having mentioned crack cocaine at all.

“No where did I say they would spend all that money on crack. I said they would spend it in six months. At no point did I say on crack cocaine.”

Normal White Cleveland man harassed 70-year-old Black Man with racial slurs and stabbing threats

An Ohio man enlisted his 4-year-old son to racially harass their 70-year-old neighbor, according to police.

Keirian Kelly allegedly threatened to stab the black woman several times over the last three months at their downtown Cleveland apartment building, reported Cleveland.com.

The threats started in July, when the woman said she accidentally fell into Kelly’s wife in the lobby of their apartment building.

The 28-year-old Kelly and his wife argued with the woman, and he remained angry even after the wife calmed down.

The woman said Kelly called her the N-word during the July 26 incident, and he then beat his chest and threatened to stab her.

A security guard placed him in handcuffs and called police, the website reported.

The abuse and threats continued, and the woman said Kelly coaxed his young son into calling her the N-word — which the victim said was hurtful.

Police said the woman was visibly shaken when she filed the latest report, which resulted in Kelly’s arrest.

Kelly was charged with ethnic intimidation, a fifth-degree felony, but he was not charged in an Aug. 10 incident involving the woman.

He allegedly crossed the street after seeing the woman out walking, and she said he again hurled racial slurs and then spat at her, before threatening to kill her and her son.

15 black men exonerated after #GoodCop is caught framing them

CHICAGO (AP) —A Cook County judge on Thursday threw out the felony drug convictions of 15 black men who all say they were locked up for no other reason except that they refused to pay former Chicago police sergeant Ronald Watts.

 One by one, the men told the same story: A Chicago police officer would demand money from them. And if they didn’t pay, they would find themselves in handcuffs with drugs stuffed in their pockets.

It was the largest mass exoneration in memory in Chicago. And even in a city where it has become almost routine for police misconduct to lead to overturned convictions, the courthouse had never seen anything like the order issued in front of more than a dozen men whose lives were changed forever by the former sergeant.

The men described how it was common for blacks in the city’s poorest communities to be shaken down.

“Everyone knew if you’re not going to pay Watts, you were going to jail. That’s just the way it was going,” said Leonard Gipson, 36, who had two convictions tossed out.

“Watts always told me, ‘If you’re not going to pay me, I’m going to get you.’ And every time I ran into him, he put drugs on me,” he said. “I went to prison and did 24 months for Watts, and I came back home and he put another case on me.”

“I had to, I had a baby due,” said 33-year-old Marcus Watts, who pleaded guilty to drug charges in exchange for a six-month sentence and a second set of drug charges in exchange for a seven-month sentence. “The way I looked at it was if they put the cuffs on you, you already lost.”

He and others said there was nothing anyone could do about it. They watched Watts and his crew continue to extort residents, a practice that lasted for years, despite complaints to the police department and statements made during court hearings.

Finally, in 2013, Watts and another officer pleaded guilty to stealing money from an FBI informant, but Watts’ sentence of 22 months was shorter than those being handed out to the men he framed.

Thirteen of the 15 men were out of custody before Thursday’s hearing, with the other two still behind bars on unrelated charges. Their sentences ranged from nearly a decade to probation. Some said the only reason they were out of custody is that they agreed to plead guilty in exchange for shorter sentences than the drugs planted on them might have produced.

Reached by phone Wednesday, Joshua Tepfer, the lead attorney for the 15 men, praised the “unprecedented” action by Foxx’s office but said the cases were “the tip of the iceberg” when it comes to cases tainted by Watts.

“It’s a remarkable effort by the state’s attorney’s office to recognize the significance of this horrendous injustice and to do their part to start correcting it,” Tepfer said. “But there are still more than 400 convictions (by Watts’ team) that are unaccounted for … it’s no doubt the tip of the iceberg.”

Prosecutors asked the judge to act after the conviction-integrity unit of the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office reviewed the cases.

“In all good conscience we could not let these convictions stand,” said Mark Rotert, who heads the unit.

The office’s agreement to throw out the sentences was part of a larger effort to regain public trust, he said.

In the last two years, the city has seen an officer charged in the 2014 shooting death of black teenager Laquan McDonald. Jason Van Dyke is the first Chicago officer in decades to be charged with first-degree murder in an on-duty killing.

Just this week, prosecutors announced they would not retry two men who have long maintained their innocence. One man spent 29 years in prison for a double murder he insists he did not commit. The other spent 27 years in prison in another double murder case involving an officer who has had several convictions overturned amid allegations that he beat suspects and coerced witnesses.

Police said late Thursday that seven police officers who were once part of Watts’ crew have been removed from street duties while their conduct years ago is investigated.

When asked earlier about the status of the officers tied to Watts, Superintendent Eddie Johnson noted none had been convicted of a crime and their jobs couldn’t be taken from them arbitrarily.

The University of Chicago’s Exoneration Project is examining another 12 to 24 cases, but the problem is much larger because Watts was involved in about 1,000 cases and perhaps 500 convictions over eight years, said Joshua Tepfer, a defense attorney with the project.

State’s attorney spokesman Robert Foley said prosecutors are investigating dozens of other cases and identified a pattern suggesting “corrupt activity” involving Watts and “members of his crew.”

Chicago has paid more than a half billion dollars to settle police misconduct cases in a little more than a decade.

Tepfer would not discuss what the men might do next, but it is almost a certainty that at least some of them will sue the city and the police department. He offered a hint about what those lawsuits might contend.

“These convictions stick with you,” he said. “You can’t get back the time you served. It affects your ability to get jobs, housing. You get thrown off of public aid with a felony conviction.”

Charges finally brought in 1983 lynching case

Suspects have finally been arrested and charged in the 1983 slaying of a black man in Georgia. 23 year old  Timothy Coggins was found dead on October 9, 1983, in Sunny Side, a town about 30 miles south of Atlanta. Coggins had been  beaten, stabbed, and dragged through the woods while tied to the back of a pickup truck.

 

The case broke in October with new witness testimony which led to the arrests of four men and a woman.

At a Wednesday bond hearing for suspects Frank Gebhardt, 59, and William Moore, 58, Griffin Judicial Circuit District Attorney Ben Coker accused them of acting brutally and having racist intentions.
“The murder of Timothy Coggins was due to Coggins socializing with a white female and that Coggins had been stabbed multiple times and drug behind a truck by Franklin Gebhardt and William Moore Sr.,” Coker told the court, according to CNN affiliate WSB-TV.
The revelations in the 34-year-old case came Coker argued the two men charged with killing Timothy Coggins should be denied bond. The defense argued both men were too old and feeble to pose a threat to the community, but the judge still denied bail.
Sheriff Darrell Dix deputized Oscar Jordan and Clint Phillips III, the original investigators on the case in 1983, so they could take part in the arrest.

Miami firefighters hang noose around black colleagues family photos

 The Miami Herald reported that six Miami firefighters have been fired after they hung a noose on a black colleague’s family photo. Photos of the firefighter’s children and mother were also defaced with lewd drawings of genitals in the September 9th incident.

The firings came Wednesday after police interviewed 20 people at the fire station.

Miami City Manager Daniel Alfonso said investigators found “sexually explicit and racially offensive conduct”.

“We cannot and will not tolerate behaviour that is disrespectful, hurtful and compromises the integrity of the department and the City of Miami,” Mr Alfonso said in a statement following the police investigation.

Alfonso also said personnel assigned to the station were transferred after the incident was reported, adding that 11 firefighters were relieved from duty with pay ahead of Wednesday’s firings.

Firefighters Kevin Meizoso, David Rivera, Justin Rumbaugh, Harold Santana and Alejandro Sese were fired, as well as William Bryson – the son of a former fire chief- were all terminated. 

According the Herald, more than 20 people were interviewed under oath and nearly a dozen firefighters were investigated. Five remain employed by the department and under scrutiny.

In the termination letters, officials said Sese was the one who came up with the idea of obtaining the photos and defacing them. Meizoso, Rumbaugh and Santana drew the phallic images while Rivera returned them to their picture frames.
Bryson is accused of failing to stop the vandalism and ignoring requests from subordinates to come forward and report the incident, the Herald reported.

Under their contracts, they firefighters can challenge their terminations.

In the nearby city of Pompano Beach, Florida, four firefighter recruits were dismissed in August following a similar incident, in which a noose was hung over the desk of a black recruit.

White teens opt to wear racist costumes for Halloween again

A South Carolina college is investigating social media posts that appear to show students in “racially insensitive” Halloween costumes, the school’s president said.

College of Charleston President Glenn McConnell said in a statement that the school’s Division of Student Affairs and Department of Public Safety are probing whether students violated the code of conduct or other college rules.

The school’s Black Student Union said one post showed a racial slur written on someone’s bare skin, while another showed a student wearing an orange jumpsuit with the name “Freddie Gray,” whose death in Baltimore police custody sparked a riot amid complaints about police brutality against black suspects. The caption said “ur going to jail tonight.” A third post showed two people wearing orange jumpsuits with the caption “niggas broke out”.

That student was a recent graduate of Boys Latin School of Maryland, where the image prompted officials to warn that there’s no place for racism in their community.

Other elite private high schools in Baltimore also said their students have been involved in racially offensive Halloween costumes posted on social media.

The Baltimore Sun report ed that the Gilman School and Roland Park Country School identified their students in a photo that shows the teens in orange jumpsuits with a racial slur in the caption. A third school, Mount Saint Joseph High School, said the photo was taken and captioned by one of its students.

Gilman and Roland Park administrators said in a statement that the people who took the pictures, wrote captions on them and shared them online are not the students in the photos. Gilman Headmaster Henry Smyth wrote in a letter to school families that the incident disappointed him.

DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WHITE PEOPLE: IT’S REAL

We dig into an… article from frontpagemag.com, a right wing outlet.
The writer is Daniel Greenfield and he is here to teach about how rich and poor white people are being discriminated against by rich, coastal,  black ass, uppity elites n’ shit.

We also have our regular news and comment around this.

Hold us down with paypal.me/PhoenixAndWilliam or Patreon.com/WineCellarMediaFund.

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Most Houston Texans kneel during anthem after owner’s comment about ‘inmates running prison’

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/texas/2017/10/28/inmates-running-prison-texans-owner-apologizes-twice-remark-nfl-protests
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White nationalists rally in Tennessee, cancel second event after being taunted by counterprotesters

http://www.sentinelsource.com/news/national_world/white-nationalists-rally-in-tennessee-cancel-second-event-after-being/article_30785597-0396-57a8-8539-584fd3362afa.html
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TruNews says that “Satan is using the Disney Channel to increase sexual perversion and confusion in the hearts of God’s children.”

NFL team owners call their players “inmates trying to run the prison” 

ESPN reports that during a series of closed-door meetings among NFL team owners, executives, and players some progress has been made in determining the direction of the league. Players want the right to protest during the anthem, while team owners are more hesitant. After a week of argument, debate, and repeatedly calling black players the wrong names, the most inappropriate comment of all came from Houston Texans owner Bob McNair.

“We can’t have the inmates running the prison,” said McNair, a multimillion-dollar Trump campaign contributor, according to an ESPN report about the conference. 

NFL executive and former player Troy Vincent reportedly took the most offense to the comment, engaging in heated back-and-forth with McNair and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones—a hardliner against NFL players kneeling. 

McNair later apologized to Vincent, per ESPN. McNair doesn’t deny what he said, he only “feels horrible and that his words weren’t meant to be taken literally.” 

Additionally, the report observed how Jones and Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder were openly angry with San Francisco 49ers owner Jed York for allowing ex-quarterback Colin Kaepernick to kneel a year ago, kicking off the league’s national anthem “crisis.” 

On Friday morning, the Texans released a statement from McNair: “I regret that I used that expression. I never meant to offend anyone and I was not referring to our players,” he said. “I used a figure of speech that was never intended to be taken literally. I would never characterize our players or our league that way and I apologize to anyone who was offended by it.”

Student files lawsuit after being expelled for not standing during pledge of allegiance

As America’s national anthem protests have grown louder, consuming the NFL, the office of the president and a good chunk of public discourse, India Landry has had her own silent revolt, sitting quietly during the Pledge of Allegiance at her Houston high school.
The 17-year-old senior was one of many relatively anonymous people who have followed the lead of former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who knelt during the national anthem in 2016 to protest police violence against black people, among other discrimination.

At Windfern High School, India and other students are required to stand during the pledge, even if they don’t recite it. But for the past 200 or so school days, India told Houston CBS affiliate KHOU, she refused to “stand for the pledge because it goes against everything I believe in.”

For months, her act of civil disobedience attracted little fanfare, according to a lawsuit filed by her mother, Kizzy Landry. It’s something she says she’s done for years, but it was never a problem until now. But on Oct. 2, she was summarily expelled by school officials, who told her that “this isn’t the NFL.”

Few people remember it, but the case in which the United States Supreme Court first decided students’ rights regarding the Pledge of Allegiance actually originated in West Virginia. The case was West Virginia state board of education vs. Barnette (1943). In that case, the Supreme Court struck down a resolution that allowed schools to expel students who refused to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance on the basis that refusing to stand constituted an act of insubordination. The Court held that forcing students to stand for the Pledge constituted compelled speech and violated the First Amendment.

Americans can’t wait to snitch on neighbors, ICE can’t stop doxxing snitches 

The Immigration and Customs and Enforcement website inadvertently dumped personal information for hundreds of callers and their neighbors as part of a Trump administration hotline to snitch on immigrants.
Hundreds of call logs are available for download on the ICE website, and much of the personal information — but not all of it — is redacted for privacy and security reasons, reported Splinter News.

The spreadsheets detail calls into the Trump administration’s Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement (VOICE) hotline, which was set up to “provide proactive, timely, adequate, and professional services to victims of crimes committed by removable aliens.”

The call logs reveal hundreds of callers turning in relatives, neighbors and acquaintances for minor infractions.

“Caller requested to report her mother-in law and sister-in law,” reads one report. “Caller stated these individuals came to the U.S. as tourists and stayed in the U.S. in order to get legal status.”

One caller even provided the date and location of an upcoming divorce hearing where an alleged undocumented immigrant was scheduled to appear, and others seemed to be reporting neighbors for simply existing.

“Caller claims his next door neighbors are undocumented and are from South America,” one report reads. “Caller claims two boys’ ages 14 and 15 reside there along with an adult male.”

Many of the calls came from individuals reporting their accusers in domestic violence cases, as well as reporting alleged undocumented immigrants of violent crime.

Splinter News examined two spreadsheets available for download on the ICE website, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request, and found much of the private data had been redacted.

But the news website conducted Google searches for some of the data and found a second spreadsheet, covering April until mid-August, hosted on the ICE website that contained two columns of unredacted personal information — including names, cell phone numbers, alleged crimes, addresses, and Social Security numbers.

That sensitive data revealed personal information for both callers and alleged undocumented immigrants they had reported.

In some cases, the details would have revealed to targets who had informed on them.

“I don’t think they got their sh*t together over there to be honest, pardon my English,” said Jerrold Kestenberg, of Nahant, Massachusetts.

He spoke to Splinter News after calling the hotline to report a neighbor, but was surprised to learn his own phone number, along with his girlfriend’s name and the neighbor’s address, could be found online.

“I’m not too happy about it — sh*t, I mean, I don’t think she wanted that,” he told the website. “I didn’t want them to put it out there, just look into it.”

Kestenberg said he never even received a follow-up call about the report.

Splinter News said the unredacted information remained online three days after notifying ICE about the spreadsheet, and nearly a day after sending a link to the data.

Together, the logs are a grim running diary of a country where people eagerly report their fellow residents to the authorities, or seek to bring the power of the immigration police to bear on family disputes. On May 25, 2017, one man called to say that his stepson was violating a restraining order by parking his car near his house. He didn’t want his wife to know that he was trying to get her son deported.

Javier H. Valdés, the co-executive director of the immigration-rights group Make the Road New York, wrote in an email to Splinter that the logs demonstrate VOICE was little more than an attempt to sow fear and suspicion of immigrants. “Months after the creation of the VOICE program, it’s clear that it’s exactly what we feared it would be,” he wrote. “A sinister public relations ploy to paint immigrants as criminals and foster fear in our communities, all with the despicable goal of tearing apart our families. The program should be immediately ended.”