Category: Rape culture

Omarosa, Catholics, And Explosive Misogyny

With William working extra hours to try to get promoted to another department, The Wine Cellar will be doing these fast action drive by episodes in an attempt to keep the content flowing to you. 
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11 Year Old Black Girl Tortured By #GoodCop, Kevin Brown Because Snacks

An 11-year-old girl who was suspected of stealing food from a Cincinnati supermarket was tased by an off-duty police officer on Monday night.

The girl, who was suspected of stealing items from a Kroger store, was shocked with a Taser stun gun after she allegedly ignored an officer and started to walk away, Cincinnati police said in a statement.

 

“It hit my back real fast and then I stopped, then I fell and I was shaking and I couldn’t really breathe,” the girl, Donesha Gowdy, told NBC News in an interview alongside her mother. “It’s just like you’re passing out but you’re shaking.”

The fourth-grader said that she did not try to fight the officer and that she was not aggressive toward him.

Donesha Gowdy, center, with her mother and sister.
Donesha Gowdy, center, with her mother Donna Gowdy and sister.NBC News

The officer who stunned the child was identified as Kevin Brown, 55, in court documents. Police said he was working off-duty as a security guard.

Cincinnati police department procedure says officers should avoid using tasers on children under 7 or on people over 70.

“I’m not saying what she did was cool, I’m not saying that, but what he did was totally wrong,” the girl’s mom, Donna Gowdy, told NBC News.”Whoever thought of these rules needs to step back and think. I’m not just worried bout my own [child]. I’m not trying to see any kid get done like that.”

The procedure also states that “an individual simply fleeing from an officer, absent additional justification, does not warrant the use of the TASER.”

“We are extremely concerned when force is used by one of our officers on a child of this age,” Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot K. Isaac said in the statement. “As a result we will be taking a very thorough review of our policies as it relates to using force on juveniles as well as the propriety of the officers’ actions.”

Donesha Gowdy
Donesha GowdyNBC News

Donesha was charged with theft and obstructing official business. She was taken to a children’s hospital after the incident and eventually released to one of her parents, according to the police statement.

“We are saddened by this situation,” a spokesperson for Kroger said in a statement. “Nothing is more important to us than the safety of our customers and associates. Our thoughts are with the family and child.”

Joseph Blaettler, a retired deputy chief of police in New Jersey with 30 years of experience, told NBC News that the incident appears to be an “unreasonable” use of force.

“Use of force comes down to what’s reasonable and what’s not reasonable. So it comes down to what the officer was facing,” said Blaettler. “Generally speaking, tasing an 11-year-old, in my opinion, would be unreasonable.”

Brown tried to turn on his body camera but it did not do so immediately, only providing footage from after the incident, police said, according to NBC affiliate WLWT. Brown has been placed on restricted duty, the station reported.

An investigation has been opened by Vice Mayor Christopher Smitherman, according to the station.

The girl’s mother noted that the officer didn’t know how old her daughter was or if she had a condition, like asthma, that could have resulted in a serious health emergency.

“I told my daughter: ‘I hope you learn from this. You risked your life over some candy,'” Donna Gowdy said.

Rape Victim Of Good Cop Gets Case ReOpened Thanks To Journalism And #MeToo

After protesting outside St. Louis police headquarters and calling out her alleged rapist, he filed a restraining order against her. Then, more restraining orders game in.

 

ST. LOUIS – The St. Louis Circuit Attorney said she’s reopening the criminal investigation into a St. Louis Police officer accused of rape.

It’s fallout from an ongoing 5 On Your Side I-Team investigation into how some police use their jobs to pressure women for sex.

For Michelle Roesch, the year 2008 wasn’t easy.

 

So she got help from two St. Louis Metro police officers who were also brothers. Roesch said they called her ex, and got him to back off.

“I thought they were protecting me,” said Roesch.

But later that evening, things took a turn for the worse.

Roesch was living in a top floor apartment in south St. Louis. Below her lived the cousin of those two cops. And that night, that cousin decided to have a party.

While sitting next to one of the brothers, who was in his uniform, Roesch said he started doing something strange.

“He started checking me for needle marks. He took his hands and skimmed id down my arms, legs and feet, tried to get me to take off my shirt. I was like, ‘I’m not a drug addict,'” said Roesch.

Then she says the 6-foot-plus cop pulled her into a bathroom.

“He started with forcing himself on me,” said Roesch. “He was pulling out my hair, punching me in the face.”

Roesch said then the police officer raped her.

She also said she felt like she had no way out.

“He had the gun right there the whole time,” said Roesch.

She eventually arrived at a hospital with a swollen upper lip, bruising around her nose and the back of her neck, and with pain in her genital area.

One problem: Roesch had just started her period, so a rape kit wasn’t possible.

But even without that, her medical records show she was diagnosed as a victim of sexual assault, with a recommendation that Roesch report it. She did, according to an incident report.

“I was fearful, fearful of retaliation with police,” said Roesch.

So she filed a restraining order against the officer, stating that he had raped her and hit her. The cop signed and agreed to it.

Then she said she reported the incident to police internal affairs.

But Roesch said the circuit attorney’s office eventually gave her bad news.

“They looked at me and said ‘He’s not going to be charged.’ I said ‘Did I say something wrong, did I do something wrong? What’s going to happen when he does it again?'” said Roesch.

Roesch said she just folded into herself and stayed that way for years.

Until:

“Everybody kept telling me about #MeToo,” said Roesch.

Inspired, she said she made a decision. She began protesting outside St. Louis police headquarters with a picket sign and a bullhorn, calling out her alleged rapist.

“I did use his name, but I also had checked with law enforcement. It was my First-Amendment right,” said Roesch.

But shortly after the protests began, Roesch was hit with a restraining order. It was a type of protective order that can be easily gotten without a hearing.

In this case, it had been filed by the officer she accused of raping her. It said Roesch could no longer mention him on social media or during her protests.

She was stunned.

“I had never had one before this,” said Roesch.

But it opened the floodgates.

Soon the officer’s brother and his wife filed for and got the same sort of order.

Then, people from St. Louis and Indiana also received orders of protection against Roesch. They’re people Roesch says she’s never even meet.

At one point, Roesch had twelve restraining orders against her.

And soon, someone claimed that she violated one of the orders. Police arrested her and charged her with a felony.

“My reaction was just horror,” said Chelsea Merta, Roesch’s attorney.

Merta took a close look at the orders filed against Roesch. Her conclusion: “They’re frivolous. They filed these orders to silence her to keep her from sharing her story.”

So Merta took Roesch’s case and started getting hearings before actual judges.

Earlier this month, in St. Louis County court, Merta and Roesch were ready to face off with her accused rapist, his brother and his wife, who had all filed orders of protection against her.

“We’re doing all three at one time. So everyone’s testimony will be all at once,” said Merta of the hearing.

But in the end, none of them showed up for court and the judge revoked their orders against Roesch.

Outside the courtroom, Roesch was tearfully grateful.

“I am speaking out on behalf of all of the rape victims,” said Roesch.

But she was also defiant.

“I also want to add you’re not above the law and you can’t and will not silence me anymore.”

Since then, Merta has gotten nearly all of the other protective orders against Roesch thrown out in court. But Roesch still faces felony charges for supposedly violating some of those restraining orders.

In the meantime, the lawyer for the accused officer tells us her client was previously cleared of any allegations and had even passed a lie detector test.

#GoodCop Desmond Logan Is Another Taxpayer Funded, Armed Rapist

A Chattanooga police officer under investigation for sexual misconduct was previously accused of raping a woman while on the job in 2015, according to another police officer and an alleged victim.

Their statements contradict information provided by police Chief David Roddy, who stated during a June 16 news conference that “there have been [no complaints] relative to this type of investigation” against the officer. The alleged victim, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Matt Lea and an internal affairs file confirm the subject of the current investigation is Officer Desmond Logan.

Roddy said in June that the officer, who was assigned to the Neighborhood Policing Bureau, has been placed on paid leave pending the outcome of the investigation.

Another alleged victim, a current police officer and a separate source assert the officer has been accused of raping at least one additional woman while on duty and that department leadership knew about that allegation. The claim dates back to 2015 when a local woman said she informed the department Logan raped her in an empty parking lot late one night.

Her allegations would turn up last month in a file she said was shown to her by investigators looking into the June 13 incident.

A police officer, who spoke under the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation, said the most recent alleged assault was just one of at least two Logan committed while on duty.

“It echoed back to the last time when they didn’t act on this kid [Logan],” the officer said. “They knowingly allowed a predator to keep that uniform on.”

Two women told the Times Free Press they made allegations against Logan.

The police department on Friday canceled a scheduled interview with Roddy and declined to set one up the next day. The department did not respond to a request to interview Logan.

Department spokeswoman Elisa Myzal sent a statement, explaining the department’s internal affairs unit would finish conducting its investigation into the June incident after the criminal investigation by the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office.

Details about the two alleged incidents are similar. Both women allegedly were picked up by Logan, told they were under arrest, taken to a parking lot and raped. The woman who said she was assaulted last month confirmed the incident through her attorney but didn’t want to provide additional details.

The Times Free Press does not identify alleged rape victims. The woman who claims she was raped by Logan in 2015 — shortly after he began actively working as an officer — is identified as Victim 1. The victim who brought forth allegations that resulted in the current investigations is identified as Victim 2.

Victim 1

Victim 1 has tried to forget the night of her alleged rape in 2015.

“I’m more cautious,” she said. “It’s had a toll, mentally.”

She was visiting a friend’s house near Rossville Boulevard late that night. She believes it was May, shortly before her birthday, but she knows it was either spring or early summer. She was in shorts, a tank top and flip-flops.

A police officer pulled alongside her after she left her friend’s house. He told her she was stumbling. That wasn’t true, she said. She hadn’t been drinking and wasn’t on drugs. She was going to a family member’s home for the night.

The officer changed his message. He told her there had been rapes in the area and he was looking out for her. Then, he became agitated. He told her she was being arrested and handcuffed her. She asked why and told him she had done nothing wrong. He placed her in the front seat of his car, she said, and drove.

She said the officer told her his name was “Officer Tate,” but his name tag said “Logan.” Years later, she found out from detectives his first name was Desmond. She became uneasy; she had been arrested before, but this arrest seemed different. She hadn’t done anything wrong, she said. But “Tate” kept telling her she was going to jail.

He eventually turned into a business parking lot on Rossville Boulevard. She thought he was going to remove the handcuffs and let her go. Instead, he pushed her into the back seat and raped her, she said.

The officer repeatedly told her not to tell anyone. He began talking about his children, telling her he had a family of his own, she said.

“He acted like nothing had happened,” she said.

He dropped her off at her brother’s, again telling her not to tell anyone, she said. She promised she wouldn’t.

She rushed inside, crying and shaking, and told her brother what happened. She wrote down everything she could remember before calling police, she said.

She explained what happened and was told to go to a hospital. The hospital sent her to the Partnership Rape Crisis Center, where she told her story and was tested for signs of rape. She also turned over her written account of what happened that night to the rape crisis center, where she was told it would help with an investigation into the officer, she said.

Seeking Answers

A portion of an Open Records Act request filed in June seeking the rape test’s results has not been responded to. Logan’s personnel file and internal affairs file have no mention of Victim 1 or any previous sexual assault complaints before Victim 2, the woman who reported the June 13 incident. The personnel file has little more than hiring paperwork.

Logan’s internal affairs file contains one sheet of paper. The top lists personal information: name, employee number, badge number and hiring date along with his department, division and sector. Below, reads “Incidents.”

The file lists several general allegations made by Victim 2 for the alleged sexual assault last month. The investigation into that incident remains ongoing.

A Knock on the Door

Little has officially happened in the three years since Victim 1 said she was raped. There is no record of an official investigation in Logan’s files.

She said she is trying to deal the best she can with what she said happened that night.

“I’ve tried to forget,” she said.

Three weeks ago, everything changed. Chattanooga Police Department internal affairs investigators came to her house, she said. They told her they had been looking into another case and came across her file. Two detectives with the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office also stopped by. With them, they had a file with her allegations — the sheet of paper she had written on the night of the alleged rape.

Two agents with the Federal Bureau of Investigation also came. The FBI did not confirm nor deny an investigation into Logan.

“Longstanding Department of Justice policy prohibits the FBI from confirming or denying the existence of any investigation,” bureau spokesman Jason Pack wrote in an email.

However, the detectives left businesses cards, which Victim 1 showed the Times Free Press.

Moving Forward

Chad Phillips, the attorney representing Victim 2 for Sutherland & Belk, PLC, confirmed the law firm is gathering information for a legal case.

Chattanooga Police Department representatives have said over the last month they take sexual assault allegations seriously. Roddy echoed that sentiment during the June 16 news conference.

“When a community member comes forward and states an officer has not upheld his or her oath, failed to serve and protect or violated their trust, that officer will be questioned,” Roddy said. “His or her actions will be investigated, and if found true, that officer will be held accountable.”

Deadliest Catch Star Sexually Abuses Minor, Avoids Jail Time

Deadliest Catch costar Edgar Hansen on Friday admitted sexually abusing a 16-year old girl last fall. Hansen admitting to touching the girls genitals and making her touch his genitals.

In exchange for his plea to fourth-degree assault with sexual motivation, Hansen, 47, was given a suspended sentence of 364 days in jail, meaning he will not spend time behind bars. He also received two years’ probation and various fees and fines totaling $1,653, with an additional $4,800 fine suspended, court records show.

Hansen was further ordered to undergo a sexual deviancy evaluation and treatment and provide a DNA sample to law enforcement.

The prosecuting attorney’s office agreed not to pursue any charges that may arise in the future in connection with the case, which was first reported on by the Seattle Times.

In a brief handwritten statement accompanying his guilty plea, Hansen acknowledged “touching [the victim’s] private areas … for the purpose of my own sexual gratification.”

The assault occurred on Sept. 30 in Snohomish County, Washington, court records show. The victim, described only as a 16-year-old girl, reported her abuse to her therapist in late October, saying it took place at a local home.

The victim said Hansen “kissed her on the lips, touched her vagina and had her touch his penis,” prosecutors stated in a probable cause affidavit.

Investigators spoke with Hansen’s wife, who said she “confronted him” after learning of the abuse, the affidavit shows. He “initially denied” it but “eventually admitted that he kissed [the victim] and touched her inappropriately.”

In his statement with his plea, Edgar wrote that he has “commenced treatment to ensure that nothing like this assault ever happens again.

Spain Updates/Upgrades Consent Laws

Image result for Spain consent laws

Hey gang. 
For this free episode, we’re going to glance over at Spain and take a look at how they’re progressing. 

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Spain Creates New Sexual Consent Law

Spain’s government has introduced a new law regarding consent with the goal of removing ambiguity in rape cases.

Under the law, consent would have to be explicit. It states that “yes means yes” and anything else, including silence, means no. Sex without explicit consent would therefore be considered rape.

The move follows outrage over the verdict in the la manada (wolf pack) case. Five men involved were accused of gang-raping an 18-year-old woman in Pamplona during the bull-running festival.

Two of the men filmed the assault, during which the woman is silent, doesn’t move, and has her eyes closed. The judges interpreted her as consent – one judge even commented that she appeared to be enjoying herself – and the charges were dropped from rape to the lesser crime of sexual assault.

Under Spanish law, rape must involve violence and intimidation. The la manada ruling provoked outrage and led to demonstrations across the country. The five men are out on bail pending an appeal against their nine-year sentence. Among them are a soldier and a member of the civil guard, both of whom have been returned to duty.

In her summing up for the prosecution, Elena Sarasate said: “The defendants want us to believe that on that night they met an 18-year-old girl, who after 20 minutes of conversation with people she didn’t know agreed to group sex involving every type of penetration, sometimes simultaneously, without using a condom.”

Proposing the law, Carmen Calvo Poyato, Spain’s deputy prime minister and equality minister, said: “If a woman does not expressly say yes, then everything else is no.”

Patricia Faraldo Cabana, a law professor at the university of A Coruña, who helped draft the law, said the proposal understood consent not just as something verbal but also tacit, as expressed in body language.

“It can still be rape even if the victim doesn’t resist,” she said. “If she is naked, actively taking part and enjoying herself, there is obviously consent. If she’s crying, inert like an inflatable doll and clearly not enjoying herself, then there isn’t.”

In a letter to a Spanish TV station, the la manada victim wrote: “Don’t keep quiet about it because if you do you’re letting them win. No one should have to go through this. No one should have to regret having a drink, talking to people at a fiesta, walking home alone or wearing a miniskirt.”

The law mirrors similar legislation that came into force in Sweden at the beginning of July.

Sex Offender Released For The Third Time By Police

A high-risk sex offender was re-arrested and subsequently released on bail, Toronto Police say. In a news release on Friday afternoon, police noted that the man was arrested Wednesday for breaching previous bail conditions. This is the second time the man is alleged to have breached those conditions since his initial release from prison on February 14, 2018.

Joseph Thayakaran Joseph, 45, was released after an eight year sentence for two counts of sexual assault, sexual assault with a weapon, three counts of forcible confinement, and assault. Joseph ran a successful headhunting company when he was arrested in July 2005 for preying on two women.

He was convicted in 2008 of three counts of forcible confinement, two counts of sexual assault, one count of sexual assault with a weapon and one count of assault.

At his trial, Joseph admitted he pretended to be a vice-president of entertainment for media giant Viacom to seduce 20 to 30 women from 1995 and 2005. He became violent in 2005, forcibly confining and sexually assaulting two women — one at gunpoint.

Joseph was released from prison on February 14, 2018 under strict court-ordered conditions that included reporting weekly to police, not entering into an intimate relationship with a woman unless she was identified to police and not using social media without specified permission.

On the same day, police issued a public warning about the sex attacker’s release out of concern he was a “high-risk” to re-offend.

Joseph was re-arrested less than two months later, on April 6, 2018, and police alleged Joseph was using dating sites to pose as a wealthy business man, while using photos of other men. Joseph was later released after posting bail.

According to detectives, Joseph was arrested on again July 11,2018, but was released yet again on July 13, 2018 for breaching his court-ordered release conditions – making this second such arrest since walking out of prison on Valentine’s Day.

Constable Caroline de Kloet said the 45-year-old has allegedly been using dating websites, specifically seekingarrangement.ca, and calling himself Dr. Lewisus.

“It’s alleged he claims to be a doctor and makes offers to help women financially or with medical treatment,” she said. “It is further alleged that he offers prescriptions for medical marijuana.”

According to the bail conditions provided in the media release, Joseph must report to police weekly, is barred from entering a relationship with a woman until they have been identified to police, cannot use social media accounts without permission, and cannot contact a person on social media without permission 24 hours in advance. He is required to provide social media passwords to police, and must report his employment or change of addresses or phone numbers to police within 24 hours.

Police are asking that anyone who may have had contact with him to contact investigators at 416-808-7474.

‘They Were Abusing Us the Whole Way’: A Tough Path for Gay and Trans Migrants

Jade Quintanilla, a transgender woman from El Salvador, says she was robbed, exploited and abused on the trip to seek asylum in the United States.CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

TIJUANA, Mexico — Jade Quintanilla had come to the northernmost edge of Mexico from El Salvador looking for help and safety, but five months had passed since she had arrived in this border town, and she was still too scared to cross into the United States and make her request for asylum.

Violence and persecution in Central America had brought many transgender women such as Ms. Quintanilla to this crossroads, along with countless other L.G.B.T. migrants. They are desperate to escape an unstable region where they are distinct targets.

Friends in San Salvador, Ms. Quintanilla said, were killed outright or humiliated in myriad ways: They were forced to cut their long hair and live as men; they were beaten; they were coerced into sex work; they were threatened into servitude as drug mules and gun traffickers.

Still, just a few miles from the border, Ms. Quintanilla, 22, hesitated. “I’ve gone up to the border many times and turned back,” she said in a bare concrete room at the group home where she was living, holding her thin arms at the elbows. “What if they ask, ‘Why would we accept a person like you in our country?’ I think about that a lot. It would be like putting a bullet to my head, if I arrive and they say no.”

While the Trump administration has tightened regulations on asylum qualifications related to gang violence and domestic abuse, migrants still can request asylum on the basis of persecution for their L.G.B.T. identity. But their chances of success are far from certain, and the journey to even reach the American border is especially risky for L.G.B.T. migrants.

Trans women in particular encounter persistent abuse and harassment in Mexico at the hands of drug traffickers, rogue immigration agents and other migrants, according to lawyers and activists. Once they reach the United States, they regularly face hardship, as well.

There are no numbers available disclosing how many L.G.B.T. migrants seek asylum at the border each year or their success rate, but lawyers and activists say that the number of gay, lesbian and trans people seeking asylum each year is at least in the hundreds.

In weighing whether to risk the journey north, many L.G.B.T. migrants from Central America gamble that the road ahead cannot be worse than what they are leaving behind.

Victor Clark-Alfaro, an immigration expert at San Diego State University who is based in Tijuana, said that he has noticed more openly L.G.B.T. people in recent years making the journey to the border with hopes of seeking asylum. He said they are often the victims of powerful criminal gangs in Central America and Mexico — but also of bigoted neighbors, police officers and strangers.

“The ones who can’t hide their sexuality and gender, there’s a huge aggression toward them. And of them, trans women are the ones who are most heavily targeted,” Mr. Clark-Alfaro said. In Central America and Mexico, “almost everyone is Catholic, and so the machismo and religious sensibilities provoke attacks against people who break gender norms.”

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, an arm of the Organization of American States, has spoken out against the high rates of violence against L.G.B.T. people in Central American countries and Mexicoand has noted that the crimes against them are often committed with impunity.

Image
A Frida Kahlo mural inside Jardin de las Mariposas, an L.G.B.T.-focused drug rehabilitation home in Tijuana, Mexico, that has hosted dozens of Central American migrants in recent months.

 

CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

Shortly after Ms. Quintanilla and two friends began their journey north to Tijuana from Tapachula, in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas, in January, they were robbed. With no more money, they walked along the highway for long stretches of time in between rides, about 13 days altogether, Ms. Quintanilla said.

In Veracruz, the group boarded the so-called Beast, a train in Mexico often used by migrants to travel north; there, she said, she was sexually exploited.

“They say you can ride on top of the train,” Ms. Quintanilla said. “But the reality is different. We had to give our services so that they’d let us on. They were abusing us the whole way through. And if we refused, they’d threaten to push us off.”

She reached Tijuana in February and was taken in by Jardin de las Mariposas, an L.G.B.T.-focused drug rehabilitation home that has hosted dozens of Central American migrants in recent months. The director of the Mariposas, Yolanda Rocha, with whom Ms. Quintanilla has spoken about the journey, vouched for the account Ms. Quintanilla shared with The New York Times. She said that Ms. Quintanilla had appeared traumatized and exhausted when she arrived at Mariposas.

Warnings about trans migrants being neglected and abused in United States custody have amplified fears for Ms. Quintanilla and other trans migrants. A 2016 report by Human Rights Watch detailed pervasive sexual harassment and assault at detention facilities, based on interviews with dozens of transgender women.

In May, a transgender woman named Roxana Hernandez died in New Mexico, while held in custody by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, after experiencing cardiac arrest and H.I.V.-related complications.

In interviews with The Times, several trans women described humiliation by guards and said they had been sexually assaulted by other detainees.

Seventy-two migrants who identify as transgender were being held in custody by ICE as of June 30, according to data provided by the agency. The vast majority are from Central America and Mexico. It is difficult to pinpoint how many L.G.B.T. people might be in detention because they often choose not to disclose their sexual orientation or gender identity, for fear of discrimination, even though it could help their asylum case.

“A lot of the queer men experience threats and physical assault and sometimes sexual assault. The trans women who are put into men’s facilities experience sexual assault at remarkably high numbers,” said Aaron Morris, a lawyer and the executive director of Immigration Equality, which provides legal assistance related to immigration and asylum to L.G.B.T. people.

ICE operates a housing unit specifically for transgender detainees at the Cibola County Correctional Center in New Mexico. Activists say that the center is far better than others, where trans women are held alongside men. But many trans women are reluctant to relocate to the Cibola center, Mr. Morris said, if it is far away from their lawyers or networks of family members.

Reports of abuse at detention centers range from guards making fun of natural facial hair that grows in between grooming to other inmates threatening violence. Of 237 allegations of sexual abuse or assault filed by ICE detainees in 2017, the agency’s records show that 11 were filed by transgender people.

In some cases, migrants say they are not taken seriously when they report attacks.

One trans woman from Honduras said she had been harassed and sexually assaulted several times by men while in custody at the Otay Mesa Detention Center in San Diego, which is operated by CoreCivic. The woman requested anonymity because her asylum request is currently under review.

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A Pride Flag covered the main entrance of the shelter in Tijuana.CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

Speaking in an interview with her lawyer present in Los Angeles, she described several safety issues that stem from the center grouping trans women with men and having them share bathrooms. At one point, she said, she awoke to a man forcing himself onto her and shoving his tongue into her mouth; she said she was told to ignore it by the guards, even though she was afraid that she would get in trouble because of rules against physical contact.

In other instances, she said, men would pull back the curtains in the shower to masturbate in front of her and other trans women.

“They say we have support and protection in there, but the reality is different,” the woman said. “I’m not the only one. Ask any trans woman, they will each have a bad story about something that happened to them in detention.”

In a statement, ICE spokeswoman Danielle Bennett said that the agency has “zero tolerance for all forms of sexual abuse or assault” and that it investigates every allegation reported.

Activists have demanded that the government avoid holding trans women and other L.G.B.T. migrants in detention altogether. Just over half of trans people are held at the specialized unit at the Cibola center, the ICE spokeswoman said, whereas the dozens spread across other facilities are “housed in units at the facility based on their physical gender.”

The Honduran woman said she was disappointed to find the guards at the center where she was held to be so dismissive. In her hometown, she said, she had been viciously attacked by a man who struck her with a machete. She never reported the crime, though he had targeted her several times before, she said. “In Honduras, it’s better not to go to the police, because that just makes it worse. If they don’t kill me, they’ll kill one of my family members.”

Raiza Daniela Aparicio Hernandez, 33, a transgender human-rights activist from El Salvador, said she was physically assaulted in 2016 by four police officers in her home in San Salvador, which she shared with her boyfriend. The officers had harassed and threatened her before, arriving at their home without a warrant and demanding to be let in, before barging in and assaulting them. “They beat me. They beat me a long time,” she said.

Ms. Aparicio Hernandez and her partner tried to file a formal complaint about the abuse in El Salvador she said, but they ran into obstacles along the way. She left El Salvador in June 2017 and arrived at the San Ysidro point of entry, on the border between Tijuana and San Diego, to request asylum.

Before speaking to The Times, Ms. Aparacio Hernandez shared her account with her lawyer. She won asylum through the courts on the merits of her case.

“Leaving my country was such a hard decision,” she said. “I’ve seen a lot of friends die in this fight, at the hands of the government, and people being beat and tortured. And this is happening at the hands of police officers. It’s sad, and it’s difficult, but you have to fight.”

Marcos Williamson, the detention relief coordinator for Transcend Arizona, a Phoenix-based nonprofit group that helps L.G.B.T. migrants, said asylum seekers who are released from detention on bond often struggle to make ends meet because they are given neither benefits nor work permits. L.G.B.T. people, who often do not have the support of family members, are particularly alone.

For now, Ms. Quintanilla feels safe at Mariposas, though she has been accosted on the streets of Tijuana and harassed, she said. She is grateful to the center for taking her in. And she is not yet ready for what comes next in her long journey.

“I decided to leave because I didn’t want to die. It would just be too much for them to reject me,” she said. “What good would it have been to flee my country?”

Reversing Climate Change Is A Plastic Straw Away.

They have figured it out, gang.
Fukeshima, Garbage Patches, Sea Level Rise, Climate Change And Weather Extremes…

KISS IT ALL GOODBYE!!!!!

By drinking from a disposable mouthpiece instead of a disposable cup, and thowing that disposable mouthpiece in garbage instead, you can play your part in like less garbage n’ stuff.

Let’s Do It!!!!

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/winecellarmedia/2018/07/09/reversing-climate-change-is-a-plastic-straw-away

Is it wrong or right to suspend a vote for partisan reasons.?

 

 

Ohio teens given suspended sentence for dropping sandbag off overpass that killed man

The four Ohio teens who pleaded guilty to dropping a sandbag off a freeway overpass that killed a 22-year-old man were given a suspended sentence and ordered to a treatment center on Friday.

Marquis Byrd was the passenger in a vehicle that was hit by the sandbag dropped onto Interstate 75 in Toledo last December. Byrd was left in critical condition and died three days later in the hospital.

 

 

 

Rapists Make Great Ferttilizer White T-Shirt Front

And The Wine Is Getting Active On TEE SPRING
Click Image for shopping page.

We don’t know why 2 T’s are showing up in the image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sex Workers Meet in Los Angeles To Draft Statement of Principles

In late June, members and supporters of Desiree Alliance, a sex work advocacy organization, gathered in the Los Angeles office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) to begin organizing for the legalization of sex work. The event featured nearly a dozen sex workers, including adult actress and Los Angeles-based sex work activist, Siouxsie Q.

Attendees at the meeting drafted a manifesto called the National Sex Worker Anti-Criminalization Principles, which author and escort Maggie McNeill described as a document designed to “provide a working template for a national platform” for sex-worker rights.

 

Pride in London sorry after anti-trans protest

 

Pride march rainbow flagPride in London organisers have apologised after anti-trans protesters “forced their way to the front of the parade”.

Members of lesbian and feminist group Get The L Out demanded to march behind the rainbow flag, which marks the start of the event, organisers said.

The group argues the trans movement is attacking lesbian rights and said it protested to protect those rights.

Pride said their behaviour on Saturday was “shocking and disgusting”.

It said they could not forcibly remove the small group because their protest was not a criminal offence, adding “we are sorry” but the “actions of eight people did not stop the joy and love”.

 

An Alabama corrections officer has been indicted on charges of rape in metro Atlanta.

Matthew Moore, 49, is accused of raping women in three states, including women in Cobb and Fulton counties.

His indictment only pertains to his alleged crimes in Fulton County, the district attorney’s office there announced Thursday.

He was arrested in April at the prison where he’d worked nearly two decades, which is about 120 miles from Sandy Springs.

Nikki Yovino Gets Pressured Into Changing Her Statement Via Sentencing Coercion. 

Nikki YovinoOn June 5, Nikki Yovino went to jail. She had maintained for the previous 20 months that she was raped by two Sacred Heart University students in the bathroom at a house party. The men she accused said it was consensual, and that’s what prosecutors and police in Bridgeport, Connecticut, believed too.

The state charged Yovino with filing a false report to law enforcement and evidence tampering, based on their allegation that she’d had a rape kit performed while lying about having been raped. Yovino, 19, faced up to six years in prison. She had pleaded not guilty, but on the morning jury selection was to begin, Yovino took a plea deal to spend a year behind bars. She was taken away in handcuffs while her mom dabbed tears from her eyes in the courtroom.

 

SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR ADULTS
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