Category: Social Issues

11 Year Old Black Girl Tortured By #GoodCop, Kevin Brown Because Snacks

An 11-year-old girl who was suspected of stealing food from a Cincinnati supermarket was tased by an off-duty police officer on Monday night.

The girl, who was suspected of stealing items from a Kroger store, was shocked with a Taser stun gun after she allegedly ignored an officer and started to walk away, Cincinnati police said in a statement.

 

“It hit my back real fast and then I stopped, then I fell and I was shaking and I couldn’t really breathe,” the girl, Donesha Gowdy, told NBC News in an interview alongside her mother. “It’s just like you’re passing out but you’re shaking.”

The fourth-grader said that she did not try to fight the officer and that she was not aggressive toward him.

Donesha Gowdy, center, with her mother and sister.
Donesha Gowdy, center, with her mother Donna Gowdy and sister.NBC News

The officer who stunned the child was identified as Kevin Brown, 55, in court documents. Police said he was working off-duty as a security guard.

Cincinnati police department procedure says officers should avoid using tasers on children under 7 or on people over 70.

“I’m not saying what she did was cool, I’m not saying that, but what he did was totally wrong,” the girl’s mom, Donna Gowdy, told NBC News.”Whoever thought of these rules needs to step back and think. I’m not just worried bout my own [child]. I’m not trying to see any kid get done like that.”

The procedure also states that “an individual simply fleeing from an officer, absent additional justification, does not warrant the use of the TASER.”

“We are extremely concerned when force is used by one of our officers on a child of this age,” Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot K. Isaac said in the statement. “As a result we will be taking a very thorough review of our policies as it relates to using force on juveniles as well as the propriety of the officers’ actions.”

Donesha Gowdy
Donesha GowdyNBC News

Donesha was charged with theft and obstructing official business. She was taken to a children’s hospital after the incident and eventually released to one of her parents, according to the police statement.

“We are saddened by this situation,” a spokesperson for Kroger said in a statement. “Nothing is more important to us than the safety of our customers and associates. Our thoughts are with the family and child.”

Joseph Blaettler, a retired deputy chief of police in New Jersey with 30 years of experience, told NBC News that the incident appears to be an “unreasonable” use of force.

“Use of force comes down to what’s reasonable and what’s not reasonable. So it comes down to what the officer was facing,” said Blaettler. “Generally speaking, tasing an 11-year-old, in my opinion, would be unreasonable.”

Brown tried to turn on his body camera but it did not do so immediately, only providing footage from after the incident, police said, according to NBC affiliate WLWT. Brown has been placed on restricted duty, the station reported.

An investigation has been opened by Vice Mayor Christopher Smitherman, according to the station.

The girl’s mother noted that the officer didn’t know how old her daughter was or if she had a condition, like asthma, that could have resulted in a serious health emergency.

“I told my daughter: ‘I hope you learn from this. You risked your life over some candy,'” Donna Gowdy said.

Russia Hacked Kamala Harris’ Web Page And Bernie Is Like All Racist N’ Stuff

The first rule of police fight club is that you should totally get caught doing police fight club. 

…of course. 

Hey Gang. 
We also have a short list of stories compiled by Phoenix Calida (@UppittyNegress on the twitter). 
We have our short breaks. 
1. With Nina Turner reppin’ for #HoodProgressives on CNN. 
2. With MJ Rodriguez talking about trans employment in cis-sexist entertainment. 

We have a Black serial killer with Black victims.
Canada is getting their deportation on with that DNA game.. 

Bernie Sanders is doing something that would help poor Black people, so of course, Imani (@AngryBlackLady) Gandi thinks it’s racist because only middle class and #RichBlackLivesMatter

 

 

Man To Stand Trial For The Murder Of A Sex Worker

A Bay Area man will stand trial on charges he murdered a sex worker and dumped her body in a trash bin at a shopping center last year.

But defendant William Li’s attorney said while there was evidence his client may have moved the body of 30-year-old Lijun Wang after she died, there wasn’t enough evidence to prove Li killed the victim.

Li has pleaded not guilty to a criminal complaint alleging he killed Wang the night of Feb. 5, 2017, according to court records.

Wang, a Chinese national who came to the country in February 2016, was working as a sex worker to pay off debts incurred while traveling to the United States, police said. Wang, who was 5-feet-3-inches tall and weighed 90-pounds, was found dead, wrapped within three bags on Feb. 6, 2017, in a trash bin.

On Wednesday investigators testified Wang’s cause of death was “asphyxiation by neck compression” and that she was killed less than 24 hours before she was found.

After a two-month investigation, police arrested Li in San Mateo. Li initially admitted to being in a romantic relationship with Wang, and investigators said Li was tied to “the organized crime” group for which Wang worked as a prostitute, but did not say what Li’s role was.

Detective Jeff Horn, said police haven’t identified a direct motive, although they have considered that problems in the romantic relationship between Wang and Li could have led to Wang’s death. But they believe Li is the killer based on cell phone call records and geolocation records, Li’s statement to detectives and other “strong circumstantial evidence.”

That evidence, according to testimony Tuesday and Wednesday, included surveillance video from a nearby business that shows a car that matched the description of Li’s near the trash bin, the night before a homeless man found Wang.

Forensic experts also testified chips of paint found on Wang’s body matched at least two paint samples from the San Mateo auto body shop where Li worked. The chips were also in the trunk of Li’s car.

Web histories on computers and an iPhone seized during the investigation included searches on the Sun-Star’s coverage of murder and how to delete phone records, Merced Police Detective Allen Adrian testified.

Li’s attorney, Merced-based Jeffrey Tenenbaum, rejected the broken relationship story and police allegations Li was involved with a sex-trafficking organization. Tenenbaum says the evidence doesn’t point to more than a platonic relationship between the two.

Wang, Tenenbaum said, was Li’s masseuse, adding that Li helped Wang with legal issues. Tenenbaum said the purpose of a meeting between the two the day of the murder was for Li to give back Wang’s passport because she requested it.

Tenenbaum also said a lack of motive or any evidence suggesting Li killed Wang meant the murder charge didn’t fit.

“I will grant you that there’s been a lot of evidence presented that Mr. Li transported a dead body,” Tenenbaum said to Horn on the witness stand Wednesday. “But how can you be certain that Mr. Li killed this woman?”

The difference, Tenenbaum said, meant charging Li with being an accessory to murder after the fact rather than murder. The former is a less serious felony with a lighter possible sentence.

But in a preliminary hearing, a judge has to determine if the murder case should go to trial based on a “reasonable suspicion” it happened.

On Tenenbaum’s insistence that there was no motive for murder, Judge Ronald Hansen said there also was no motive for Li moving Wang’s body other than the allegation that Li killed her.

“There is no motive, no direct evidence,” Tenenbaum said, noting Li has a family with three kids, and works hard as a mechanic. “He maintains his innocence.”

Li’s next hearing is scheduled for Aug. 20.

Tech Company Offers Schools Facial Recognition Technology

RealNetworks, the Seattle company best known for pioneering streaming media in the early days of the web, is deploying a controversial new product. The company said it will offer a new facial recognition technology, called SAFR, for free to K-12 schools to help upgrade their on-site security systems.

SAFR can be used with the same cameras that traditional surveillance systems to recognize students, staff, and people visiting schools. RealNetworks said that in addition to security, the tool can also help with record-keeping and “campus monitoring.” The technology is compatible with Mac, iOS, Android, and Windows.

“SAFR from RealNetworks is highly accurate facial recognition software powered by artificial intelligence,” the company explains on the SAFR site. “It works with existing IP cameras and readily available hardware to match faces in real-time. Schools can stay focused and better analyze potential threats such as expelled students, and those who pose a threat from within and outside the school.”

“We feel that’s going to enhance the security of schools but also lead to more convenience, a simple way of entering a school campus,” RealNetworks Chief Technology Officer Reza Rassool explained.

The ACLU has been vocal in its criticism of facial recognition technology and said there are big red flags with this program.

“I think often it’s put out there by well-intentioned people but the impacts are often felt by vulnerable communities,” said Shankar Narayan, the technology and liberty project director with the ACLU or Washington.

Developers said they understand those fears but said individual districts control the data. Narayan worries a system like this might keep some parents from coming to campus “what are these systems recording, who gets the data for what purpose is that data going to be used?”

Narayan said undocumented immigrants or parents with a criminal history might be hesitant to come to their child’s school.

RealNetworks said they understand that some people might be a little skittish with the technology and that’s why they believe the program should be voluntary.

State Review Board Says Death Of Inmate India Cummings Was A Homicide

BUFFALO, NY – The attorney for the family of woman who died after being held at the Erie County Holding Center in 2016 says he is not surprised by the official findings of the incident, which offer a scathing rebuke of the conduct of her jailers.

The report was prepared by the New York State Commission of Correction, which has oversight over jails and prisons throughout the state.

“It validates everything that we set forth in our complaint and everything I’ve alleged from the very beginning,” said Matthew Albert, who represents survivors of India Cummings. “Disturbing doesn’t even come close to doing justice to what happened to India…which was heartbreaking,” Albert told 2 On Your Side.

Though heavily redacted in parts, the report still paints a picture of the treatment, or lack thereof, offered to Cummings while in custody, which goes beyond “scathing” or “damning,” according to Albert

“The one adjective that needs to be used here, is ‘criminal’, because that’s what this was,” Albert said.

The report concludes, among other things, Cumming’s “manner of death was homicide by medical neglect.”

Cummings was arrested in Lackawanna after committing a carjacking, leading police on a chase which resulted in collisions with three other vehicles, and fighting with officers after she was finally stopped in February 2016.

Taking her to the Erie County Holding Center with a broken arm was the first of several errors noted by the review panel, which contends, “a mental health referral for ECMC would have been appropriate.”

Cummings spent 17 days in the jail, during which time the report says she was combative with officers, destroyed her cell, refused medical treatment, or food at times, and babbled while urinating and defecating on the floor.

However, despite observing this, the report says her jailors made no immediate referrals to the jail physician or reports to jail administration.

Dr. F. Scott LaPoint, who performed the autopsy on Cummings has said he could not determine cause of death without more information, but said he believed an untreated broken arm was a contributing to the death of Cummings. He noted he could not certain whether Cummings broke her arm in a car crash, or when arrested by police, or in later clashes with jail deputies. So he could not say if the break was accidental or inflicted by others. But the pathologist said muscle and tissue damage released chemicals that led to kidney failure through a condition called rhabdomyolysis. Further, high levels of ketones in her body – ketoacidosis – existed before she arrived at the jail and probably explained her ongoing confusion and erratic behavior, he wrote.

Only when she went into cardiac arrest was Cummings taken to Buffalo General where she died, with the review panel stating: “had she received appropriate medical care, her death would have been prevented.”

“An analogy would be a mother just allowing her baby, who is sick or something like that, to just sit there until her baby passes away. That’s what we have here, is a depraved indifference to India’s wellbeing by those who were in custody of her,” Albert said.

Albert noted especially a passage in the 33 page report in which the review panel states, “The medical and mental health care provided to Cummings by Erie County during the course of incarceration, and her care, custody and safekeeping by Erie County sheriff deputies was so grossly incompetent and inadequate as to shock the conscience.”

Through a spokesperson, Erie County Sheriff Tim Howard declined comment on the report, due to ongoing litigation.

Meanwhile, Albert is calling on Erie County District Attorney John Flynn to launch a criminal investigation into Cumming’s treatment and death, and to bring charges against those in whose care and custody she had been.

A spokesperson for Flynn told 2 on Your Side that his office has yet to receive a copy of the report, but will review it and make a determination once they do.

“They could throw us ‘x-amount’ of millions of dollars today, and justice would not be served,” said Albert. “Justice is only served if the individuals that caused her death are on the other side of the bars at the holding center.”

Spain Creates New Sexual Consent Law

Spain’s government has introduced a new law regarding consent with the goal of removing ambiguity in rape cases.

Under the law, consent would have to be explicit. It states that “yes means yes” and anything else, including silence, means no. Sex without explicit consent would therefore be considered rape.

The move follows outrage over the verdict in the la manada (wolf pack) case. Five men involved were accused of gang-raping an 18-year-old woman in Pamplona during the bull-running festival.

Two of the men filmed the assault, during which the woman is silent, doesn’t move, and has her eyes closed. The judges interpreted her as consent – one judge even commented that she appeared to be enjoying herself – and the charges were dropped from rape to the lesser crime of sexual assault.

Under Spanish law, rape must involve violence and intimidation. The la manada ruling provoked outrage and led to demonstrations across the country. The five men are out on bail pending an appeal against their nine-year sentence. Among them are a soldier and a member of the civil guard, both of whom have been returned to duty.

In her summing up for the prosecution, Elena Sarasate said: “The defendants want us to believe that on that night they met an 18-year-old girl, who after 20 minutes of conversation with people she didn’t know agreed to group sex involving every type of penetration, sometimes simultaneously, without using a condom.”

Proposing the law, Carmen Calvo Poyato, Spain’s deputy prime minister and equality minister, said: “If a woman does not expressly say yes, then everything else is no.”

Patricia Faraldo Cabana, a law professor at the university of A Coruña, who helped draft the law, said the proposal understood consent not just as something verbal but also tacit, as expressed in body language.

“It can still be rape even if the victim doesn’t resist,” she said. “If she is naked, actively taking part and enjoying herself, there is obviously consent. If she’s crying, inert like an inflatable doll and clearly not enjoying herself, then there isn’t.”

In a letter to a Spanish TV station, the la manada victim wrote: “Don’t keep quiet about it because if you do you’re letting them win. No one should have to go through this. No one should have to regret having a drink, talking to people at a fiesta, walking home alone or wearing a miniskirt.”

The law mirrors similar legislation that came into force in Sweden at the beginning of July.

Sex Offender Released For The Third Time By Police

A high-risk sex offender was re-arrested and subsequently released on bail, Toronto Police say. In a news release on Friday afternoon, police noted that the man was arrested Wednesday for breaching previous bail conditions. This is the second time the man is alleged to have breached those conditions since his initial release from prison on February 14, 2018.

Joseph Thayakaran Joseph, 45, was released after an eight year sentence for two counts of sexual assault, sexual assault with a weapon, three counts of forcible confinement, and assault. Joseph ran a successful headhunting company when he was arrested in July 2005 for preying on two women.

He was convicted in 2008 of three counts of forcible confinement, two counts of sexual assault, one count of sexual assault with a weapon and one count of assault.

At his trial, Joseph admitted he pretended to be a vice-president of entertainment for media giant Viacom to seduce 20 to 30 women from 1995 and 2005. He became violent in 2005, forcibly confining and sexually assaulting two women — one at gunpoint.

Joseph was released from prison on February 14, 2018 under strict court-ordered conditions that included reporting weekly to police, not entering into an intimate relationship with a woman unless she was identified to police and not using social media without specified permission.

On the same day, police issued a public warning about the sex attacker’s release out of concern he was a “high-risk” to re-offend.

Joseph was re-arrested less than two months later, on April 6, 2018, and police alleged Joseph was using dating sites to pose as a wealthy business man, while using photos of other men. Joseph was later released after posting bail.

According to detectives, Joseph was arrested on again July 11,2018, but was released yet again on July 13, 2018 for breaching his court-ordered release conditions – making this second such arrest since walking out of prison on Valentine’s Day.

Constable Caroline de Kloet said the 45-year-old has allegedly been using dating websites, specifically seekingarrangement.ca, and calling himself Dr. Lewisus.

“It’s alleged he claims to be a doctor and makes offers to help women financially or with medical treatment,” she said. “It is further alleged that he offers prescriptions for medical marijuana.”

According to the bail conditions provided in the media release, Joseph must report to police weekly, is barred from entering a relationship with a woman until they have been identified to police, cannot use social media accounts without permission, and cannot contact a person on social media without permission 24 hours in advance. He is required to provide social media passwords to police, and must report his employment or change of addresses or phone numbers to police within 24 hours.

Police are asking that anyone who may have had contact with him to contact investigators at 416-808-7474.

‘They Were Abusing Us the Whole Way’: A Tough Path for Gay and Trans Migrants

Jade Quintanilla, a transgender woman from El Salvador, says she was robbed, exploited and abused on the trip to seek asylum in the United States.CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

TIJUANA, Mexico — Jade Quintanilla had come to the northernmost edge of Mexico from El Salvador looking for help and safety, but five months had passed since she had arrived in this border town, and she was still too scared to cross into the United States and make her request for asylum.

Violence and persecution in Central America had brought many transgender women such as Ms. Quintanilla to this crossroads, along with countless other L.G.B.T. migrants. They are desperate to escape an unstable region where they are distinct targets.

Friends in San Salvador, Ms. Quintanilla said, were killed outright or humiliated in myriad ways: They were forced to cut their long hair and live as men; they were beaten; they were coerced into sex work; they were threatened into servitude as drug mules and gun traffickers.

Still, just a few miles from the border, Ms. Quintanilla, 22, hesitated. “I’ve gone up to the border many times and turned back,” she said in a bare concrete room at the group home where she was living, holding her thin arms at the elbows. “What if they ask, ‘Why would we accept a person like you in our country?’ I think about that a lot. It would be like putting a bullet to my head, if I arrive and they say no.”

While the Trump administration has tightened regulations on asylum qualifications related to gang violence and domestic abuse, migrants still can request asylum on the basis of persecution for their L.G.B.T. identity. But their chances of success are far from certain, and the journey to even reach the American border is especially risky for L.G.B.T. migrants.

Trans women in particular encounter persistent abuse and harassment in Mexico at the hands of drug traffickers, rogue immigration agents and other migrants, according to lawyers and activists. Once they reach the United States, they regularly face hardship, as well.

There are no numbers available disclosing how many L.G.B.T. migrants seek asylum at the border each year or their success rate, but lawyers and activists say that the number of gay, lesbian and trans people seeking asylum each year is at least in the hundreds.

In weighing whether to risk the journey north, many L.G.B.T. migrants from Central America gamble that the road ahead cannot be worse than what they are leaving behind.

Victor Clark-Alfaro, an immigration expert at San Diego State University who is based in Tijuana, said that he has noticed more openly L.G.B.T. people in recent years making the journey to the border with hopes of seeking asylum. He said they are often the victims of powerful criminal gangs in Central America and Mexico — but also of bigoted neighbors, police officers and strangers.

“The ones who can’t hide their sexuality and gender, there’s a huge aggression toward them. And of them, trans women are the ones who are most heavily targeted,” Mr. Clark-Alfaro said. In Central America and Mexico, “almost everyone is Catholic, and so the machismo and religious sensibilities provoke attacks against people who break gender norms.”

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, an arm of the Organization of American States, has spoken out against the high rates of violence against L.G.B.T. people in Central American countries and Mexicoand has noted that the crimes against them are often committed with impunity.

Image
A Frida Kahlo mural inside Jardin de las Mariposas, an L.G.B.T.-focused drug rehabilitation home in Tijuana, Mexico, that has hosted dozens of Central American migrants in recent months.

 

CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

Shortly after Ms. Quintanilla and two friends began their journey north to Tijuana from Tapachula, in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas, in January, they were robbed. With no more money, they walked along the highway for long stretches of time in between rides, about 13 days altogether, Ms. Quintanilla said.

In Veracruz, the group boarded the so-called Beast, a train in Mexico often used by migrants to travel north; there, she said, she was sexually exploited.

“They say you can ride on top of the train,” Ms. Quintanilla said. “But the reality is different. We had to give our services so that they’d let us on. They were abusing us the whole way through. And if we refused, they’d threaten to push us off.”

She reached Tijuana in February and was taken in by Jardin de las Mariposas, an L.G.B.T.-focused drug rehabilitation home that has hosted dozens of Central American migrants in recent months. The director of the Mariposas, Yolanda Rocha, with whom Ms. Quintanilla has spoken about the journey, vouched for the account Ms. Quintanilla shared with The New York Times. She said that Ms. Quintanilla had appeared traumatized and exhausted when she arrived at Mariposas.

Warnings about trans migrants being neglected and abused in United States custody have amplified fears for Ms. Quintanilla and other trans migrants. A 2016 report by Human Rights Watch detailed pervasive sexual harassment and assault at detention facilities, based on interviews with dozens of transgender women.

In May, a transgender woman named Roxana Hernandez died in New Mexico, while held in custody by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, after experiencing cardiac arrest and H.I.V.-related complications.

In interviews with The Times, several trans women described humiliation by guards and said they had been sexually assaulted by other detainees.

Seventy-two migrants who identify as transgender were being held in custody by ICE as of June 30, according to data provided by the agency. The vast majority are from Central America and Mexico. It is difficult to pinpoint how many L.G.B.T. people might be in detention because they often choose not to disclose their sexual orientation or gender identity, for fear of discrimination, even though it could help their asylum case.

“A lot of the queer men experience threats and physical assault and sometimes sexual assault. The trans women who are put into men’s facilities experience sexual assault at remarkably high numbers,” said Aaron Morris, a lawyer and the executive director of Immigration Equality, which provides legal assistance related to immigration and asylum to L.G.B.T. people.

ICE operates a housing unit specifically for transgender detainees at the Cibola County Correctional Center in New Mexico. Activists say that the center is far better than others, where trans women are held alongside men. But many trans women are reluctant to relocate to the Cibola center, Mr. Morris said, if it is far away from their lawyers or networks of family members.

Reports of abuse at detention centers range from guards making fun of natural facial hair that grows in between grooming to other inmates threatening violence. Of 237 allegations of sexual abuse or assault filed by ICE detainees in 2017, the agency’s records show that 11 were filed by transgender people.

In some cases, migrants say they are not taken seriously when they report attacks.

One trans woman from Honduras said she had been harassed and sexually assaulted several times by men while in custody at the Otay Mesa Detention Center in San Diego, which is operated by CoreCivic. The woman requested anonymity because her asylum request is currently under review.

Image

A Pride Flag covered the main entrance of the shelter in Tijuana.CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

Speaking in an interview with her lawyer present in Los Angeles, she described several safety issues that stem from the center grouping trans women with men and having them share bathrooms. At one point, she said, she awoke to a man forcing himself onto her and shoving his tongue into her mouth; she said she was told to ignore it by the guards, even though she was afraid that she would get in trouble because of rules against physical contact.

In other instances, she said, men would pull back the curtains in the shower to masturbate in front of her and other trans women.

“They say we have support and protection in there, but the reality is different,” the woman said. “I’m not the only one. Ask any trans woman, they will each have a bad story about something that happened to them in detention.”

In a statement, ICE spokeswoman Danielle Bennett said that the agency has “zero tolerance for all forms of sexual abuse or assault” and that it investigates every allegation reported.

Activists have demanded that the government avoid holding trans women and other L.G.B.T. migrants in detention altogether. Just over half of trans people are held at the specialized unit at the Cibola center, the ICE spokeswoman said, whereas the dozens spread across other facilities are “housed in units at the facility based on their physical gender.”

The Honduran woman said she was disappointed to find the guards at the center where she was held to be so dismissive. In her hometown, she said, she had been viciously attacked by a man who struck her with a machete. She never reported the crime, though he had targeted her several times before, she said. “In Honduras, it’s better not to go to the police, because that just makes it worse. If they don’t kill me, they’ll kill one of my family members.”

Raiza Daniela Aparicio Hernandez, 33, a transgender human-rights activist from El Salvador, said she was physically assaulted in 2016 by four police officers in her home in San Salvador, which she shared with her boyfriend. The officers had harassed and threatened her before, arriving at their home without a warrant and demanding to be let in, before barging in and assaulting them. “They beat me. They beat me a long time,” she said.

Ms. Aparicio Hernandez and her partner tried to file a formal complaint about the abuse in El Salvador she said, but they ran into obstacles along the way. She left El Salvador in June 2017 and arrived at the San Ysidro point of entry, on the border between Tijuana and San Diego, to request asylum.

Before speaking to The Times, Ms. Aparacio Hernandez shared her account with her lawyer. She won asylum through the courts on the merits of her case.

“Leaving my country was such a hard decision,” she said. “I’ve seen a lot of friends die in this fight, at the hands of the government, and people being beat and tortured. And this is happening at the hands of police officers. It’s sad, and it’s difficult, but you have to fight.”

Marcos Williamson, the detention relief coordinator for Transcend Arizona, a Phoenix-based nonprofit group that helps L.G.B.T. migrants, said asylum seekers who are released from detention on bond often struggle to make ends meet because they are given neither benefits nor work permits. L.G.B.T. people, who often do not have the support of family members, are particularly alone.

For now, Ms. Quintanilla feels safe at Mariposas, though she has been accosted on the streets of Tijuana and harassed, she said. She is grateful to the center for taking her in. And she is not yet ready for what comes next in her long journey.

“I decided to leave because I didn’t want to die. It would just be too much for them to reject me,” she said. “What good would it have been to flee my country?”

CVS Apologizes After “Coupon Carl” Calls Police On Black Cutsomer

CVS apologized Sunday to a black customer who said a white manager called the police after deciding that a coupon she tried to use at a Chicago pharmacy was fraudulent.

The manager and a second employee who was involved are “no longer employed by CVS Health,” the company said in a statement on its Twitter account Monday, adding that it had investigated the incident.

The company said that CVS has “firm non-discrimination policies in place to help ensure that all customers are treated with respect and dignity. Profiling or any other type of discriminatory behavior is strictly prohibited.”

The customer, Camilla Hudson, told “Today” in an interview that aired Monday that she was more upset by the way the manager handled the situation.

“I don’t take issue — not then, not now — with him not accepting the coupon,” she said. “It’s how he didn’t accept the coupon.”

Hudson first shared in a Facebook post how she presented the coupon for a defective product to a pharmacy manager last week. The manager told her he’d never seen a similar coupon and believed it was a fraud.

“When I asked for his name and his title/role within the store, he became agitated and rude,” she wrote. “When I pulled out my phone to document what happened and exactly what he’d said to me (AND how he’d said it!) he turned his back and walked away from me.”

A second manager told her that if she didn’t leave immediately, he’d call the police, she wrote. In a viral video that Hudson posted on Facebook, she can be heard confronting a manager, who appears to be describing Hudson to the authorities over the phone.

“Tell them that I will be here when they arrive,” she said. “I have ID and I will share it.”
The manager, who identifies himself in the video as Morry Matson, was a state delegate for Donald Trump in 2016, an aldermanic candidate on Chicago’s North Side and president of the Illinois affiliate of the Log Cabin Republicans, a conservative group that advocates for LGBTQ rights, according to the Chicago Sun-Times, which viewed Matson’s no-longer-active campaign website.

In an interview with the LGBTQ newspaper Windy City Times in April, Matson said the affiliate had recently been “reactivated” to remind Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner that “we still need to work on workplace discrimination. It’s still a problem in Illinois. Adoption, health costs, health insurance, keeping the cost of pills down — that’s important in the gay community.”

Matson didn’t respond to a message seeking comment on Sunday.

As with other recent incidents of alleged racial bias, he quickly earned a nickname on social media — #CouponCarl.

CVS said the employees involved in the incident won’t be working at that Chicago location pending the outcome of its internal investigation.

Hudson, meanwhile, said that after three officers arrived, she left the store at their urging. She still wants to know why the situation escalated to having law enforcement called.

“There’s nothing I did or said that would explain why he was interacting with me and treating me in the manner that he was,” she told “Today.”

Are We Surprised That Charlamagne Is A Rapist?

 

So we’ll have to dig into this. 
Of course I, William got the news nice and late so had to completely rework show prep and then prep the new show prep. 

How will we cover this. 
We mention and riff on rape culture fairly often for nearly 700 episodes. 
So with this, I think we should cover how it’s being covered. 

That’s the deal. 

Of course, the short version will be free and then the episode will continue behind the paywall. 

Audio Free

Video Behind Paywall